Michigan Gov. Whitmer facing review of coronavirus orders, bid to curb her powers, report says

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here's what you need to know as you start your day ...

Michigan Gov. Whitmer reportedly facing bid to curb her powers as protesters demonstrate outside her home
Protesters gathered outside the home of Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Thursday -- the same day reports emerged that she plans to extend the state’s coronavirus stay-at-home order by two weeks until May 15.

The demonstration, dubbed “Operation Queen’s Castle,” featured an image of Whitmer wearing a crown, FOX 2 of Detroit reported.

Meanwhile, the Michigan Legislature has scheduled a special session for Friday with the goal of creating an oversight committee to review Whitmer’s coronavirus orders and possibly strip her of some of her powers, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Critics have accused Whitmer, a 48-year-old first-term Democratic governor, of overstepping her authority with a series of measures intended to stem the spread of coronavirus in the state. Click here for more on our top story.

Other related developments: 
- To get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox, sign up here.
- Click here for Fox News' full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic
- Texas county judge's coronavirus mask order faces court challenge, hundreds of protesters
- San Diego protesters say county overreaching on coronavirus restrictions; sheriff threatens legal action
- Tucker Carlson slams coronavirus lockdowns as another blow to 'the wrong people' in rural America

Trump, health officials suggest coronavirus weakened by sunlight, humidity
President Trump and public health officials argued Thursday that higher temperatures and humidity, as well as direct exposure to sunlight, quickly kills the coronavirus, leading to hopes that the threat of the contagion could drastically recede during the summer months.

Bill Bryan, head of the science and technology directorate at the Department of Homeland Security, said solar light along with high temperatures and humidity have a “powerful effect” of creating environments less favorable for the virus to survive. A chart released by during the White House coronavirus task force news briefing by the DHS showed the novel coronavirus dies within two minutes in hot summer humidity while on surfaces and a minute and a half while in the air.

President Donald Trump listens as Bill Bryan, head of science and technology at the Department of Homeland Security, speaks about the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Donald Trump listens as Bill Bryan, head of science and technology at the Department of Homeland Security, speaks about the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Bryan, however, warned that the results from a DHS study were still in the nascent stages and cautioned Americans to continue practicing social distancing and other hygiene measures outlined by the federal government.

Earlier Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence appeared hopeful the pandemic would begin to recede as summer approaches – telling Fox News’ Geraldo Rivera it could "largely" be "behind us” by Memorial Day Weekend. Click here for more.
  
Other coronavirus developments:
- FDA commissioner predicts coronavirus vaccine 12 months away
- Pompeo blasts China for causing 'enormous amount of pain' and 'loss of life' with coronavirus cover-up
- China 'open, transparent' about coronavirus, US can't 'bully' Beijing, envoy to UK says

CDC triples number of possible coronavirus symptoms
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has tripled the number of symptoms that could be indicators of coronavirus, including muscle pain, headache and new loss of taste or smell.

The CDC previously listed three key symptoms as shortness of breath, fever and a cough. WGME-TV of Portland, Maine, reported Thursday.

The expanded list comes as researchers from around the world work to learn more about the deadly pandemic that has infected at least 2.7 million people worldwide and killed nearly 200,000.

The CDC still warns that older adults and those with underlying medical conditions continue to be at higher risk for serious complications from the virus. Its website says fever, cough,  shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell could all be symptoms that appear between two and 14 days after exposure. Click here for more

Other developments:
- Nearly 3 million New Yorkers have had coronavirus, antibody study suggests
- Coronavirus in the US: State-by-state breakdown
- Coronavirus: What you need to know

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

TODAY'S MUST-READS
America Together: Send us your photos and we'll tell your story as the nation battles coronavirus.
Bengals select Joe Burrow with No. 1 pick of 2020 NFL Draft.
Ga. governor charges forward with reopening businesses despite Trump's opposition.
NJ moves forward with saliva testing for coronavirus.
Tucker confronts ex-McKinsey partner on firm’s work with China.
Bullied boy named Corona receives special gift from Tom Hanks.
Washington state’s ‘Green River Killer,’ other inmates denied coronavirus release in 5-4 vote.

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
Gilead disputes report that its coronavirus drug failed in China trial.
J.C. Penney in advanced talks for bankruptcy financing. 
PPP coronavirus loans: Forgiveness may not be as simple as business owners think.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on "This Day in History."
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

An economic panel on "Special Report" takes a closer look at challenges to restarting the U.S. economy following the shutdown during the coronavirus pandemic.

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you're missing.

Click here to find out what's on Fox News and Fox News Radio today!
 
Fox News First is compiled by Fox News' Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Stay healthy, stay safe, and try to be positive - one way or another, we will get through this coronavirus crisis together. We'll see you in your inbox first thing Monday.