NYC building elevator where woman was trapped for 3 days had multiple problems, building dept. says

The New York City apartment building elevator that got stuck between two floors, trapping a woman inside for three days, had a burnt-out hoist motor and the emergency phone was not working, the city’s building department said.

Firefighters rescued a 53-year-old housekeeping employee on Monday around 10:10 am after receiving a 911 call and forcing entry into the elevator in a building on East 65th Street in Manhattan. She had been stuck between the second and third floors.

The FDNY couldn’t confirm exactly when she got stuck but did say she was there “over the weekend.” The woman was treated and released from Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Andrew Rudansky, a spokesman for the Department of Buildings, told NBC 4 that it has issued a cease-use order for the elevator inside the building, which is about a block from Central Park.

Outside the building where a woman was said to be trapped in an elevator since Friday.

Outside the building where a woman was said to be trapped in an elevator since Friday. (Google Street View)

He said the property owner was issued three violations: failure to properly maintain; damaged hoistway door and defective hoist motor; and communications device inoperative, machine brake maintenance tag missing, and other defects.

WOMAN TRAPPED IN ELEVATOR SINCE FRIDAY RESCUED BY NEW YORK CITY FIREFIGHTERS

NBC 4 reported the elevator was inspected in July and no violations were filed at the time.

“DOB investigation into the incident is ongoing, and we may issue additional enforcement actions as a result,” Rudansky added.

The violations carry maximum fines of $60,000.

The Associated Press reported the townhouse is owned by Warren A. Stephens, a billionaire investment banker from Arkansas, and his wife, Harriet Stephens.

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The Stephens family said Marites Fortaliza "has been a valued member of the Stephens extended family for 18 years."

“The Stephens family is relieved and thankful that she is doing well in the hospital,” the statement said. “The cause of this unfortunate incident is being investigated and appropriate measures will be taken to ensure that something like this never happens again."

Stephens is the chairman, president and CEO of Stephens Inc., an investment bank based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Fox News' Ryan Gaydos and the Associated Press contributed to this report.