Columbine survivor: 'Biased' reporters didn't want to hear why I oppose Beto's gun ban

Evan Todd, who was shot during the Columbine school massacre, appeared on "Fox & Friends" Monday to set the record straight, after he says he was misrepresented by the media with regard to his views on 2020 presidential hopeful Beto O'Rourke's proposed gun ban.

Todd questioned O'Rourke at an event in Colorado Thursday and stated his credentials as a shooting survivor, before asking how far he planned to take his gun ban. ABC later reported the exchange as if Todd was supporting the plan, when, in fact, he is against it.

"I went to hear Beto speak and if I got the opportunity to ask him where he drew the line as far as his gun confiscation plans -- and I wanted to phrase it in a way that allowed him to speak his mind and he did, Todd said. "He really is open to... banning and confiscating nearly all firearms."

He claimed members of the media turned cold when they found out he didn't support O'Rourke's plan and accused them of embracing a far-left agenda.

BETO CALLS FOR RED FLAG LAWS, MANDATORY GUN BUYBACK AND NATIONAL REGISTRY ALL IN THE SAME SPEECH

"The media, by and large, is biased and in some cases complicit with pushing the extremists' far-left agenda," Todd said. "There were many that were very interested in talking to me afterward. But, when they found out my true stance, they suddenly were less interested. So it's been crickets since they found out where I truly stood on the issue."

More from Media

Todd was injured in 1999 when two students, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, opened fire at Columbine High School in Colorado, killing 13 people and injuring 24. Harris and Klebold eventually killed themselves with gunshot wounds to the head following the massacre that left 12 students and one teacher dead.

Todd also said during his "Fox & Friends" interview that the idea of confiscating firearms from private citizens is a personal affront and will leave millions defenseless while creating more problems than it would solve.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"It's insulting and dangerous," he said earlier in the interview. "You're removing the means of protection for millions and millions of law-abiding Americans. I think his ban is misplaced.

"It goes after the wrong people and it goes after the wrong issues," Todd continued. "The law-abiding citizens in this country aren't the problem. There's an element that is a problem. And I think we need to address the realities of mental health and other issues. And the reality is that there's evil in this world."