Odessa, Texas without drinking water as temperatures soar

Residents of the West Texas city of Odessa have been without drinking water

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Crews worked to restore water service Wednesday to the West Texas city of Odessa, where residents have been without water this week amid scorching temperatures after an aging pipe broke.

The city's water treatment plant was back online by about 8 a.m. Wednesday, and utility officials said it could take 12 to 14 hours for the "recharging" process, during which workers slowly add water back into the system to ensure there are no more leaks.

The city water system's 165,000 customers’ taps lost pressure or went completely dry after the 24-inch (61-centimeter) main broke Monday afternoon, according to the city’s social media pages.

HEAT WAVE THREATENS CITIES, TEMPERATURES PASS THE TRIPLE DIGITS

Temperatures Wednesday were predicted to approach 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) as Texas — like much of the United States — faced extremely hot and humid conditions. And while Odessa typically sees hot weather in June, the timing of the break made dealing with this week’s heat more difficult.

Temperatures in Texas continue to rise as town of Odessa needs water

Temperatures in Texas continue to rise as town of Odessa needs water

City officials said at a news conference Tuesday afternoon that drinkable water could be restored later Wednesday but that the water system needed to be turned back out carefully to avoid any additional breaks.

The city, which is located about 330 miles (530 kilometers) west of Dallas, planned to distribute water to residents at Ector County Coliseum as well as deliver water to nursing homes.

TEXAS HEAT LEADS TO WARNINGS, ADVISORIES

Water tankers were placed strategically around the city to respond to any fires, said Deputy City Manager Phillip Urrutia.

"It’s an aging infrastructure that we’re seeing. It’s a cast iron pipe, and so those are typically more susceptible to breaks than other new technologies like PVC pipe that’s going in the ground," he said.

TENS OF THOUSANDS IN OHIO, INDIANA, ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN LOSE POWER IN SEVERE STORMS AS EXCESSIVE HEAT FORECAST