Massive 'ice shove' piles up along Minnesota lakefront, threatening buildings

Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.

Blustery conditions on Monday created a treacherous situation at a Minnesota lakefront as homes and businesses were threatened by a wall of ice.

The National Weather Service (NWS) Twin Cities office said gusts over 50 mph were expected throughout the region on Monday, as a cold front and storm system moved through the area.

The strong winds led to an "ice shove" on Mille Lacs Lake, a large lake roughly 100 miles north of the Minneapolis-St. Paul area.

'ICE TSUNAMI' SPAWNED BY WINDSTORM SPURS EVACUATIONS ALONG LAKE ERIE, AS THOUSANDS WITHOUT POWER ACROSS EAST

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an ice shove is created when "wind, and currents, changes in temperature" push ice onto the shore.

Ice piles up around Lake Mille Lacs in Minnesota on April 21, 2020.

Ice piles up around Lake Mille Lacs in Minnesota on April 21, 2020. (KMSP-TV)

The walls of ice that piled up Monday are more than 10 feet high in some spots.

Walls of ice are threatening structures along Lake Mill Lacs in Minnesota.

Walls of ice are threatening structures along Lake Mill Lacs in Minnesota. (KMSP-TV)

One home's deck was damaged as the ice seeped through a railing and built up to the rear windows on building.

Homeowners put plywood over their rear windows and doors to prevent any future damage.

The phenomenon is common along the popular lake, according to FOX9.

The occurrence is a result of heavy winds pushing leftover ice into piles on lakefront areas.

The occurrence is a result of heavy winds pushing leftover ice into piles on lakefront areas.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Tina Chapman, the executive director of the Mille Lacs Area Tourism Council, told WCCO-TV there's just not much homeowners can do to prevent damage.

The occurrence is a result of heavy winds pushing leftover ice into piles on lakefront areas, threatening damage to some homes.

The occurrence is a result of heavy winds pushing leftover ice into piles on lakefront areas, threatening damage to some homes. (KMSP-TV)

“If you’ve lived here, you just know it’s always a potential to happen this time of year,” Chapman said Tuesday. “If it happens, you just hope the wind is blowing the opposite direction from your house.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

A similar incident happened last year in parts of New York along Lake Erie, when a windstorm created what was dubbed an "ice tsunami."