Former UK official: US government's response to alleged UFO sightings is not good enough

The Pentagon appears to have changed its description of unidentified flying phenomena after a former Blink-182 singer released three UFO videos that were later published by the New York Times, according to a former British Defense official.

Until the videos -- released by rocker Tom DeLonge -- were released, the U.S. Navy has been mostly silent on the subject, Nick Pope told Tucker Carlson Tuesday on "Tucker Carlson Tonight."

"Up until this point, the Navy has said very little and in fact, they've left the door open sometimes," he said.

"Now, what they've done is turned around and said -- number one, 'this is real'. And number two, this is 'unidentified alien phenomena'."

UFO VIDEOS ARE FOOTAGE OF REAL 'UNIDENTIFIED' OBJECTS, US NAVY ACKNOWLEDGES

Pope said that the U.S government has previously reportedly called such alleged spacecraft "advanced unknown aircraft."

To that, Carlson said the new videos should be bigger news nationwide.

"Why is this not page-one news everywhere?" he asked.

Pope agreed there should be more focus on finding the truth behind the new videos.

FORMER BLINK-182 GUITARIST TOM DELONGE TALKS HIS QUEST TO PROVE ALIENS EXIST

"These aircraft carriers that many of these UFOs have been interacting with -- obviously these are billion-dollar assets -- and if the official position of the most powerful Navy in the world is frankly little more than 'we don't know what this is', I don't think that's good enough," he responded.

He urged Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., -- who he said has expressed interest in investigating the matter -- to request a classified briefing.

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DeLonge, who quit pop-punk group Blink 182 in 2015, started the To the Stars Academy with the mission of "advancing our current understanding of scientific phenomena and its technological implications," per its website. One of the tracks from the band's hit 1999 album "Enema of the State" is also titled "Aliens Exist."

“The Navy considers the phenomena contained/depicted in those three videos as unidentified," Navy spokesman Joseph Gradisher told The Black Vault, a website dedicated to declassified government documents.

Gradisher added that “the ‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena’ terminology is used because it provides the basic descriptor for the sightings/observations of unauthorized/unidentified aircraft/objects that have been observed entering/operating in the airspace of various military-controlled training ranges.”

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The statement has been corroborated with other media outlets. Fox News has reached out to the Navy for additional comment for this story.

The videos in question, known as "FLIR1,” “Gimbal” and “GoFast,” were originally released to the New York Times and to The Stars Academy of Arts & Science (TTSA). In December 2017, Fox News reported that the Pentagon had secretly set up a program to investigate UFOs at the request of former Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev.

Fox News' Chris Ciaccia and Jessica Napoli contributed to this report.