Madonna felt ‘raped’ by New York Times profile she considers sexist

Madonna slammed The New York Times as one of the “founding fathers of patriarchy,” saying she felt “raped” by a recent profile the Gray Lady published about her that focused on her age along with "trivial and superficial matters."

On Wednesday, the paper published a lengthy feature by Vanessa Grigoriadis headlined, “Madonna at Sixty,” but the Material Girl isn’t a fan of the finished product.

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“To say that I was disappointed in the article would be an understatement-It seems,” Madonna wrote in a scathing Instagram post. “The journalist who wrote this article spent days and hours and months with me and was invited into a world which many people dont get to see, but chose to focus on trivial and superficial matters such as the ethnicity of my stand in or the fabric of my curtains and never ending comments about my age which would never have been mentioned had I been a MAN!”

The pop music legend said that women “have a really hard time being the champions of other women” even if they “are posing as intellectual feminists.”

“It makes me feel raped. And yes I’m allowed to use that analogy having been raped at the age of 19."

— Madonna

“It makes me feel raped. And yes I’m allowed to use that analogy having been raped at the age of 19,” she wrote.

The New York Times declined to comment.

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Madonna, who is set to release a new album next week, also used the rape analogy when she spoke to Grigoriadis for the feature. She told the reporter that songs from her 2015 album “Rebel Heart” were leaked before she was ready for them to be consumed.

“It took me a while to recover, and put such a bad taste in my mouth I wasn’t really interested in making music.” Madonna told the Times. “I felt raped.”

Grigoriadis wrote that it “didn’t feel right to explain that women these days were trying not to use that word metaphorically,” perhaps prompting Madonna to use it again when criticizing the piece.

A spokesperson for Madonna did not immediately respond to a request for comment.