Lori Loughlin partaking in 'grueling' mock trials ahead of college admissions scandal court appearance: report

Lori Loughlin’s lawyer is putting her through the ringer ahead of her big court appearance.

The former “Fuller House” star is currently preparing for a major court showdown this holiday season and is vigorously preparing, a source told Us Weekly.

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Actress Lori Loughlin, left, leaves as her husband Mossimo Giannulli, right, trails behind her outside of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019.

Actress Lori Loughlin, left, leaves as her husband Mossimo Giannulli, right, trails behind her outside of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

“Lori has been meeting with her lawyers for days at a time,” the source told Us. “It’s her full-time job and she is very involved with her defense. When not at her lawyer’s office, Lori is emailing and texting with the team.”

The source also revealed that Loughlin has reportedly been conducting mock trials ahead of her court appearance.

“Her lawyer plays the prosecutor, grilling her,” said the source. The source also noted that the sessions are “grueling.”

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Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019.

Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. (Getty)

Loughlin, 55, and her fashion designer husband Mossimo Giannulli, 56, are accused of arranging a total collective payment of $500,000 to William "Rick" Singer to get their daughters recruited to USC as athletes on the crew team, despite the girls never having participated in the sport.

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The Justice Department announced in October that the duo, along with nine other parents, were indicted on additional federal charges related to bribery. A grand jury in Boston indicted the parents on charges of trying to bribe officials at an organization that receives at least $10,000 in federal funding.

The charge of conspiracy to commit federal program bribery carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. The couple was previously hit with charges of money laundering and conspiracy that could land them behind bars for 40 years if convicted on all of them. Prosecutors are pressuring those who have pleaded not guilty in the college admissions scandal to acknowledge their guilt.