Connecticut man who vanished nearly a decade ago found dead in New York home under different name

Robert Hoagland was found dead in upstate New York, but authorities don't believe he was the victim of foul play

A man who vanished in Connecticut nearly a decade ago has been found dead in New York where he was living under a different name, police said this week. 

Robert Hoagland was last seen on July 28, 2013, at a gas station in Newtown, Connecticut, authorities said. He was reported missing the next day after failing to pick up a relative from the airport. 

He also didn't show up for work that day and all his money, keys, cellphone and medication were still at his home, authorities said. Eventually, the search for him went cold.  

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Robert Hoagland went missing in Connecticut in 2013. He was found dead this week in New York living under a different name, authorities said.

Robert Hoagland went missing in Connecticut in 2013. He was found dead this week in New York living under a different name, authorities said. (Newtown Police Department)

The disappearance received widespread media attention and was featured on an episode of the Investigation Discovery series "Disappeared."

On Monday, the Sullivan County Sheriff's Office in upstate New York contacted the Newtown Police Department about Hoagland. 

The sheriff's department said deputies responded to the death of a man at a home in Rock Hill. After not being able to identify him, they found papers with the name "Robert Hoagland," authorities said. 

They later learned Hoagland had been reported missing from Newtown and believe he was living in New York under the name Richard King since about November 2013. Newtown investigators met with Sullivan County sheriff’s officials on Tuesday to confirm Hoagland’s identity.

Robert Hoagland pictured in a police missing persons bulletin.

Robert Hoagland pictured in a police missing persons bulletin. (Newtown Police Department)

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Authorities said there were no signs of foul play in his death. 

His remains were taken to the coroner for an autopsy. Police said there "was no criminal aspect" in Hoagland's disappearance.