Burger King censors its own sandwiches in new ad campaign

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For some parts of the world, the return of fast food can’t come fast enough.

While many fast food locations in the United States have shut down their dining rooms amidst the coronavirus pandemic, these restaurants were able to remain open through take-out orders and drive-thru services. This hasn’t been the case in other countries, however, leaving some people unable to get their favorite burger and fries combination.

Fortunately for Burger King fans in Belgium, the fast-food company’s locations are ready to reopen and offer drive-thru orders to customers. While this is likely exciting news for fans of the brand, Burger King urged customers in the country to “avoid frustration” and remain patient -- and inside -- until the reopening date is announced.

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Burger King Belgium released a series of photos that censored images of the brand’s famous Whopper burger (and other popular items). The popular item was covered by red boxes with messages like “No really. There’s no point in hurting yourself” and “In the meantime, let’s avoid any frustration," according to a translation.

In a statement to B and T, a news magazine, a spokesperson for Burger King said, “While waiting for this date, the brand decided to censor its most iconic burgers on its website and social networks. Yes, we want to avoid any frustration before the great day! So be patient and stay home until you find the unique taste of your favorite hamburgers in a few days!”

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While Burger King locations in the United States have remained open for drive-thru and take-out orders, they have also taken steps to adapt to the coronavirus pandemic.

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As many schools across the country have closed, Burger King recently ran a promotion where it released daily questions based on math, science or literature. Students who answered them correctly could earn a burger for their knowledge.