Prince Charles reveals what he misses about his family while in quarantine

Prince Charles opened up about missing his family while still in quarantine during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Prince of Wales, 71, admitted that all he really wants to do is give everyone a hug, especially his grandchildren: Prince William's children Prince George, 6; Princess Charlotte, 5, and Prince Louis, 2, as well as Prince Harry's son Archie, 1.

The royal also acknowledged in an interview with Sky News on Thursday that he had not seen his father, the Duke of Edinburgh, for many weeks. Prince Philip, who is isolating at Windsor Castle with Queen Elizabeth II, is set to celebrate his 99th birthday next week.

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Speaking virtually from his Scottish home of Birkhall, Charles -- the heir to the throne -- was asked about being apart from his family.

“Well, it’s terribly sad, let alone one’s friends,'' he said. “But fortunately, at least you can speak to them on telephones and occasionally do this sort of thing."

“But it isn’t the same is it? You really want to give people a hug,” he said. "I do totally understand so many people’s frustrations, difficulties, grief and anguish."

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Prince William and Kate Middleton have been staying in Norfolk while Prince Harry and Meghan Markle moved to Los Angeles.

Charles, who himself suffered from COVID-19, said contracting the novel virus made him more determined to “push and shout and prod” for a more green approach and to have nature return to the “center of everything we do.”

"I feel particularly for those who have lost their loved ones and have been unable to be with them at the time. That to me is the most ghastly thing," he said.

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"I know that so many people have had the agony of losing their loved ones and the bewilderment and anxiety that surrounds everything."

Charles also acknowledged the health care workers who have put their lives on the line. "We’ve seen at the same time people being quite remarkable and wonderful people in the National Health Service and all the other key workers who kept everything going," he added.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.