Former 'Agent Carter' star Hayley Atwell says her partner won't appear on the red carpet unless they're married

You won’t be seeing Hayley Atwell’s beau anytime soon — unless he puts a ring on it.

The 36-year-old actress, best known for starring in ABC’s canceled “Agent Carter,” told Town & Country UK’s Autumn 2018 issue she won’t appear on any red carpets with her boyfriend, a doctor she has known since she was 10 years old, unless they're married.

“If that’s on the cards for us, lovely,” said the British star about marriage, as reported by U.K.’s Daily Mail Tuesday. “The emotional connection of belonging to someone, or having the intention to build something together, that feels really nice.

“I wouldn’t want him to be on a red carpet with me, or in any way, in the public eye unless there was a ring on my finger to respect him and respect the relationship. He’s not seen on my arm as my date.”

However, Atwell insisted her mystery man isn’t really into the showbiz scene.

“I saw him watching the Oscars highlights and he said, ‘God, your job is really weird,’” she explained. “He doesn’t know anyone in terms of celebrity, so I can bring him to anything and he doesn’t change how he responds to anyone at all. That makes everyone feel very comfortable.”

These days, Atwell is keeping busy and is currently starring alongside Ewan McGregor in the new Disney film “Christopher Robin.”

Atwell also revealed that despite appearing in 2008’s “Brideshead Revisited,” a Miramax production, she avoided contact with disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

The 66-year-old, who is the co-founder of Miramax, has been accused of sexually harassing dozens of actresses, sparking the #MeToo movement in Hollywood.

“Maybe I was intentionally kept away from him. I don’t know,” Atwell reflected. “I consider myself lucky. Hollywood at that time was still very new to me. I was just out of drama school.”

Back in April, Atwell told Fox News she was starring in a period drama titled “Howards End,” which explores the social and class divisions in early 20th century England through the perspective of three families.

She insisted viewers can learn plenty from the characters, especially when it comes to talking politics.

“… This is also a time when you could say they’re both liberals, but they’re also willing to have a conversation with opposing political views in order for them to be engaged in the conversation,” she explained. “… [My character] Margaret especially, doesn’t try to change or criticize any one’s points of view. She seeks to connect with them to open up an intelligent conversation with them, to find out why they think the way that they do and to challenge her own ideas about things.”

Atwell added, “I think that’s a very mature and kind of radical approach to the opposite side of our own belief system. Can we dare to connect with other people, rather vilify or aggressively turn against them because they seem to be different than us? Can you actually engage with them in a mature and respectful conversation?"

Still, the British screen star revealed that while she wants to present a positive example for women, she’s not interested in being typecast.

“… As an actor in a way, I reserve the right to want to expand my range to play a villain and to not feel that every character I have to play has to be a positive contribution,” she said. “I’m here to be a storyteller and facilitate that and do the best I can with telling that particular story, whether that’s someone who has wildly opposing views to my own or is morally ambiguous or is indeed someone like Margaret Schlegel, who I think many people will find as a positive role model.”