Sacramento constructing $5.6M tiny home community for homeless

A Sacramento church is transforming its sanctuary and land to help tackle the mounting homelessness crisis in the California capital.

St. Paul Church of God is leasing a plot of land to the city to house 24 tiny cabin-like structures, each for two people, between the ages of 18 to 24 years old, according to the local news.

“Our community is very special, and we have a lot of homeless here, just like everybody has them," Pastor Larry Joyner told KCRA, "but we’re willing to help ours."

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There will be trailers on site for bathrooms, showers, and community space for counseling and social services inside the church building, where meals will be provided.

Residents' reactions are mixed.

One mother of four said she just doesn't know if it's a good idea with children and a school down the street, but others say if it helps them get on their feet, it's a good idea.

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The $5.6 million project, approved by the Sacramento City Council with funding from the state, is the first part of the city's five-point homeless plan.

City leaders hope to have the cabins ready for move-in next month in response to the call from Gov. Gavin Newsom's 100-day challenge. The Democratic governor has been slammed by President Trump for his poor handling of the homeless population.

Trump has said if Newsom doesn't fix the problem, the federal government will get involved.

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Californians have complained about homeless people defecating and urinating in public, needles on the sidewalk, and regular break-ins and theft.

Elizabeth Novak told Fox News she had to move her salon after it became unsafe.

"There were three break-ins, but there have been a lot more before that and syringes; people in tents on my front courtyard and I’m not allowed to ask them to move -- I didn’t feel safe, in general, there," Novak said.