Police get cooling off period before questioned in shootings

After a police officer fatally shoots someone, it can take days or even weeks before the public or his supervisors hear the officer's version of what happened.

Many states have this so-called cooling off period carved out in state law or in a police department's contract. That opportunity to take some time before undergoing questioning by investigators angers community activists and others seeking reforms of police departments. They believe it gives officers time to reshape their story to justify a shooting and avoid getting fired or charged.

The latest example arose in Fort Worth, Texas, where a police officer fatally shot a woman inside her home. He resigned before he could be compelled to undergo questioning.