California prison official watched YouTube videos for hours while on duty: report

File this under: Your tax dollars at work.

A California prison administrator spent thousands of hours watching YouTube videos instead of doing his job, according to a report released Tuesday by the California state auditor.

“On one particularly egregious day, we found that the administrator accessed 55 YouTube videos that did not appear to be related to his duties,” the auditor’s report stated. “When we shared the administrator’s Internet activity with his supervisor, she agreed that the evidence confirmed the poor work output she witnessed from the administrator.”

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The employee -- whose name was not released but worked in the education program at Valley State Prison in Chowchilla – watched more 2,256 YouTube videos between September 2017 and June 2018, according to the report. He retired before he could be disciplined, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said.

“CDCR does not believe that the administrator was aware of the investigation or that the timing of his retirement was related to investigative activity," the report said.

The videos mostly consisted of crime footage, political and religious commentary and footage of recreational vehicles, according to the audit. Sites like YouTube are normally blocked for California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation employees.

The employee was allowed to view the site because his duties sometimes required him to access some websites off-limits to others. His constant YouTube surfing resulted in poor work performance, according to his supervisor.

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The man "often revealed a surprising lack of knowledge when she asked him simple questions," and the supervisor "could not remember a week when he had worked the expected 40 hours," the auditor's office wrote.

In response to the report, the corrections department said it would explore a reporting system to identify the top internet users, the audit said.