Colin Kaepernick sends message to players still kneeling during anthem: 'Stay strong brothers'

Colin Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who sparked a firestorm three years ago when he decided to kneel during the national anthem, showed support Sunday to those NFL players who are still employed and still protesting perceived racial injustice during the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

Kaepernick’s tweet comes amid a minor backlash over rapper Jay-Z’s recent deal to advise the NFL on entertainment decisions. Carolina Panthers defensive back Eric Reid, Kaepernick’s former teammate, has been among those who have criticized the “99 Problems” lyricist and the league over the deal.

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“My Brothers @E_Reid35 @KSTiLLS @iThinkIsee12 continue to fight for the people, even in the face of death threats. They have never moved past the people and continue to put their beliefs into action. Stay strong Brothers!!!” Kaepernick tweeted.

Reid and Miami Dolphins wide receivers Kenny Stills and Albert Wilson are the only players in the league who still kneel during the anthem. Other players have raised a fist during the anthem.

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Kaepernick's comment comes as Jay-Z and his agency Roc Nation decided last week to partner with the NFL on its entertainment presentations and Inspire Change Initiative.

When asked why he didn’t involve Kaepernick in the new Roc Nation-NFL deal, Jay-Z said: “You’d have to ask him. I’m not his boss. I can’t just bring him into something. That’s for him to say.”

Jay-Z also said he and Kaepernick had a conversation about the new deal but offered no other details.

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The star did note that he feels the conversation surrounding NFL protests has “moved past kneeling,” adding that it’s “time to go into actionable items.”

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy and the Associated Press contributed to this report