Pete Buttigieg jokes he'll negotiate 'peace deal' between Chick-fil-A and the LGBTQ community

Pete Buttigieg, the openly gay Indiana mayor considering running for president in 2020, told a New York radio station Tuesday he’d negotiate a “peace deal” between Chick-fil-a and the LGBTQ community.

"I do not approve of their politics, but I kind of approve of their chicken," Buttigieg said jokingly during an interview with "The Breakfast Club," the hip-hop morning show on New York's Power 105.1.

"Maybe if nothing else, I can build that bridge. Maybe I’ll become in a position to broker that peace deal," Buttigieg said.

PETE BUTTIGIEG, SOUTH BEND MAYOR, ANNOUNCES 2020 PRESIDENTIAL EXPLORATORY COMMITTEE

The mayor of South Bend, Ind. has not officially announced his candidacy in the 2020 presidential race since launching an exploratory committee months ago. The 37-year-old enjoyed increasing popularity after introducing progressive reforms, including a measure that would bypass the Electoral College in presidential elections.

In his radio interview Tuesday, Buttigieg spoke of ways people could come together to understand each other’s unique backgrounds.

"We’ve got to find a way to use our identities to reach other people," Buttigieg said. "…What can we talk about that brings us together? Because I have no clue what it’s like to walk in the shoes of so many other people. But I can talk about some of the pieces of what I carry with me, and see if it rhymes with their life experience."

“Good art has that, good music has that, good literature has that," the mayor continued.

"Good chicken sandwiches," “The Breakfast Club” host Charlamagne Tha God quipped before Buttigieg made it clear that good politics "ought to have that quality too."

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The San Antonio City Council voted last week to ban Chick-fil-A from opening its doors at the city’s airport after Chick-fil-a received backlash for donating money to anti-LGBTQ causes, reported The Hill.

The fast-food company has been expelled from several other universities and airports, and, in 2012, was widely criticized after CEO Dan Cathy said the chain supports “the biblical definition of the family unit.”