Joe Rogan says he would tell people outraged by COVID-19 restrictions to 'vote Republican'

Rogan also said he hoped that there were 'lessons learned'

Joe Rogan, joined by Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, said that he would tell those who lost businesses due to COVID-19 restrictions to "vote Republican" on Saturday's episode of "The Joe Rogan Experience." 

While discussing COVID-19 restrictions in California and across the U.S., Rogan said that he hoped there were "lessons learned." 

"I hope there's lessons learned in this," Rogan said. "Because this is a new thing. We had never had this before. No one who is alive today had ever experienced a true pandemic. And I’m hoping that, now that this is over, people are going to, you know, recognize that some serious errors were made and not repeat those. That’s the best you can get out of it."

He added that those who were forced to close their businesses during the pandemic and "lost everything that they ever worked for," were "just going to be angry." 

Podcast giant Joe Rogan explained why he doesn’t consider himself a Republican. 

Podcast giant Joe Rogan explained why he doesn’t consider himself a Republican.  (Photo by: Vivian Zink/Syfy/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images)

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Rodgers asked what Rogan would tell those people, and Rogan responded, "vote Republican." 

Rodgers laughed and Rogan added that most of those people would be voting Republican anyway. The podcast host recently criticized Republicans for "removing freedoms" when it came to the conservative stance on abortion and gay marriage. 

"It’s not just abortion rights, but now they’re going after gay marriage too, which is so strange to me… Marco Rubio is saying that it’s like a silly thing to argue about, to be concerned about, and some other senator, who is a gay woman, confronted him and she was furious at it. 'Cause gay marriage is not silly, it’s marriage. It’s marriage for people that are homosexual and for them it’s important," Rogan said in July.

The podcast host also said that Gov. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., had "reasonable policies" in response to the pandemic. 

Quarterback Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers looks skyward during the 4th quarter of the NFC Divisional Playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers at Lambeau Field on January 22, 2022, in Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

Quarterback Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers looks skyward during the 4th quarter of the NFC Divisional Playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers at Lambeau Field on January 22, 2022, in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images)

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The Packers quarterback came under fire during the pandemic for telling reporters he was "immunized." The NFL star later admitted that he was not vaccinated and tested positive for COVID-19. 

During their conversation, Rodgers told Rogan about his decision to tell reporters he was "immunized." 

"I’d been ready the entire time for this question and had thought about how I wanted to answer it. And I had come to the conclusion, I’m going to say, ‘I’ve been immunized.’ And if there’s a follow-up, then talk about my process," Rodgers said on Saturday's episode.

Rodgers said he knew he would have to address the comments if he tested positive for COVID-19 or if word got out. 

"And that’s when the s---storm hit because now I’m a liar, I’m endangering the community, my teammates, all these people. And the attempted takedown of me and my word and my integrity began," he told Rogan.

"The Joe Rogan Experience" launched in 2010, and it quickly developed a passionate following. (Photo by Michael S. Schwartz/Getty Images)

"The Joe Rogan Experience" launched in 2010, and it quickly developed a passionate following. (Photo by Michael S. Schwartz/Getty Images) (Michael S. Schwartz/Getty Images)

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Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently sat down with Rogan and told him that the FBI approached Facebook to warn them about "Russian propaganda" before reporting on the Hunter Biden laptop story came out. 

He told Rogan that Facebook users were still able to share the New York Post story but that "ranking in [the] news feed was a little bit less" and "fewer people saw it than would've otherwise."