Bride demands guests 'gift' more money the morning after the wedding

Most couples spend their wedding night celebrating with friends and family and getting ready for their honeymoon, but one bride seemingly spent it making sure all her guests had “gifted” her the “appropriate” amount of money.

Seyi Akiwowo posted her story to her Twitter account. After traveling to Romania for a destination wedding, she and her plus-one were left with very little cash on hand. They gifted the newlyweds what they could, and planned on sending a proper gift when they got home. Unfortunately, the bride sent a “bill” almost immediately.

Her story starts off, “Okay... it was summer 2015. A good work colleague and (ex) friend was having a destination wedding in Romania. She invited me and a plus-one.” The story continued, “I won't lie to you. The wedding was DOPE. Everything was planned so well. There was even a gift bag in the hotel. I said wow. They went in.”

When it came to gifts, the couple made a seemingly reasonable request. “The wedding has a full-blown website. And the invite said they'd rather money than a gift because they wouldn't be able to transport them all home... made sense.” Of course, destination weddings can get expensive, as the poster explains, “The wedding went on for two days. Me and my friend bought our own flight, hotel (2 nights) and paid for our own expenses out there.”

While the wedding was fun, Akiwowo noticed something weird about the “gift” envelopes. “It was an open bar. And every hour was tequila time. Its gone midnight... the family are now handing out envelopes... pay attention... These envelopes looked like those Thanksgiving/ tithes envelopes in church.”

BRIDE KICKS SISTER OUT OF WEDDING BECAUSE SHE CUT HER HAIR

By the end of the weekend, Akiwowo and her friend had run out of cash and were unable to get more local currency. So, they gave what they could and held onto enough cash to get themselves to the airport and home.

Unfortunately, they didn’t realize that the bride was apparently using the gift bags to keep track of who turned in what envelope. When she got home, Akiwowo noticed that she had a message from the bride. “A Facebook message from the bride... My naive self thought she was messaging to ask if we got home okay... N O P E.”

The message read, “Hi Seyi, how are you doing? Did you enjoy our wedding and the time spent in Cluj? Did your friend enjoy it too? You seemed to enjoy plenty but this was not reflected in your contribution to our wedding costs. We’ve received a 20 euro note from you and 5 euros from your friend, which is by far insufficient to cover the costs of the menu and drinks for Sunday, not to mention all the efforts put for organizing Saturday’s garden party and the welcome packs, etc. The average contribution was 100 euro/person, while even 75 euro would be sufficient to cover the costs related to the menu, drinks and the location. I hope you understand the difficult position we would be in if all our guests would have contributed only with 5 and 20 euros. If this was not clear from the beginning, my apologies for not explaining it better.”

The message ended with instructions on how to pay more money, and how much they were expecting. “Therefore, we would appreciate if you could please make a bank transfer to our account for the difference for covering your menu and drinks, which is a minimum of 125 euro for the two of you (75 euro/person min. while both paid in total 25 euros).”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Not surprisingly, the message didn’t go over well, and the “bill” was never paid. Akiwowo concluded her story, “Safe to say I am no longer friends with the debt collector. The couple are still together and had their first baby earlier this year. I still want my €25 back.”

Several posted they were shocked at how quickly the "bill" was sent. As one user said, "My favorite part is the idea of having done the math before noon. I have yet to do such a thing and so must commend her." Another joined in, "Don’t have a destination wedding if you can’t pay for it. I had a friend whose kids “wanted” donations to charity instead of bday gifts in elem school."