5 surprising Super Bowl facts to discuss during commercials

The New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles are preparing to take to the field on Feb. 4 at Super Bowl LII, and America can’t seem to get enough of the heated match-up. And while fans certainly know who they’re rooting for and where they’ll be celebrating, they may not be aware of the following little-known facts, each of which is sure to spice up any conversation during all those commercial breaks.

#1. Both winners and losers get paid

Whether or not your favorite player wins, just securing a spot in the Super Bowl is a surefire victory for their bank account. In 2017, Sports Illustrated reported that every member of the winning Super Bowl team would pocket a cool $112,000, whether or not they played in the game. Losers reportedly received a $56,000, too. Prize sums for this year's event have not been released, but TMZ Sports estimates that the winners will take home $200,000, while losers receive $80,000.

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#2. But halftime performers don't make a dime

According to Reader's Digest, recent A-List headliners including Beyoncé, Katy Perry and Bruno Mars did not receive compensation for performing at past Super Bowls. Fans of the stars shouldn't sweat it, though, as the sheer exposure is worth millions of dollars and the halftime show often scores higher ratings than the actual game.

#3. Americans eat a lot

Super Bowl Sunday is the second-highest day of food consumption in the U.S., second to only Thanksgiving. The National Chicken Council estimated that Americans consumed a whopping 1.35 billion wings on Super Bowl Sunday last year alone. And if 2018's numbers are anything like 2017, Nielsen predicts people will spend $1.2 billion on beer, $277 million on potato chips, and $99 million on meaty snacks.

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#4. Commercials are wildly pricey

Last year, the New York Times noted that companies spent upwards of $5 million for 30-second spots. According to industry insiders, Super Bowl LII will be no different.

#5. 14 million people are expected to skip work the next day

If the thought of heading into the office the morning after football’s biggest night sounds like too much to bear, you’re not alone. USA Today reports that roughly 13.9 million Americans are expected to call in sick to work the next day, aka “Super Sick Monday.”

Future national holiday, anyone?

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