Uvalde gunman began stockpiling firearm accessories in February: 'looked like one of those school shooters'

Days before the Uvalde, Texas, shooting, the alleged shooter said that he 'did not want to live anymore'

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The person accused of committing the mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, at Robb Elementary School on May 24 began stockpiling firearm accessories beginning in February 2022, according to a report written by a Texas House committee.

Nineteen children and two adults died in the shooting that the committee revealed had "multiple systemic" law enforcement failures.

The report states that "a vague idea" for a school shooting appeared to have been in the attacker's head as early as late 2021, but he began to pursue the plot in early 2022, which was after a "falling-out" with his mother.

An argument between the two was live-streamed on Instagram, and even though law enforcement responded to a call at the scene of the incident, no arrests were made. Afterward, the alleged shooter moved in with his grandmother, who happened to live just blocks from the school.

The alleged shooter's relationship with his mother didn't improve, and he also disliked his father. At his grandmother's house, the shooter slept on the living room floor, according to the report, and even told an older cousin just days before the shooting that he "did not want to live anymore," according to the report.

TEXAS OFFICIALS: UVALDE SHOOTING REPORT REVEALS 'MULTIPLE SYSTEMIC FAILURES'

A banner hangs at a memorial outside Robb Elementary School, the site of a May mass shooting that killed 19 students and two teachers, on Friday, June 3.

A banner hangs at a memorial outside Robb Elementary School, the site of a May mass shooting that killed 19 students and two teachers, on Friday, June 3. (AP/Eric Gay)

The report also states that the father noticed that the alleged shooter had "cuts on his own face" and said he was "doing something" soon.

The alleged shooter's cousin thought she got through to him, according to the report, but at the same time "the attacker's planning and preparation became more focused." 

In February, the report states that the alleged shooter "began buying more firearms accessories," which included "60 30-round magazines, a holographic weapon sight, and a Hellfire Gen 2 snap-on trigger system."

When the alleged shooter turned 18 on May 16, according to the report, he purchased the guns and ammunition, which included 1,740 rounds of "5.56mm 75-grain boat tail hollow point to his doorstep, at a cost of $1,761.50." He also bought a Daniel Defense DDM4 V7, which is an AR-15-style rifle, according to the report, to a gun store in Uvalde that cost him $2,054.28.

UVALDE INVESTIGATION DETAILS LAW ENFORCEMENT’S ‘SYSTEMIC FAILURES’ IN SCHOOL SHOOTING RESPONSE

Law enforcement officers gather outside Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting there on May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and two adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement. 

Law enforcement officers gather outside Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting there on May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and two adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.  (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Then on May 17, he bought a Smith & Wesson M&P15, which is an AR-15-style rifle, at the same store in Uvalde, which cost him $1,081.42.

On May 18, the alleged shooter bought "375 rounds of M193, a 5.56mm 55-grain round with a full metal jacket, which has a soft core surrounded by a harder metal," according to the report, and picked up the other rifle on May 20.

The report states that the owner of the gun store that sold the weapons to him described the alleged shooter as an "average customer with no ‘red flags’ or suspicious conditions."

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When the owner asked the alleged shooter how he could afford the purchases, he responded that he had saved money.

However, in interviews with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, people who were at the store when the alleged shooter bought his gun said that he was "very nervous looking" and that he "appeared odd and looked like one of those school shooters."