Texas teacher fired after asking Trump to remove 'illegal students from Mexico' wins her job back

A Texas teacher who lost her job after asking President Trump on Twitter to remove the “illegal students from Mexico” from her school has won an appeal to get her job back.

Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath ruled Monday that the series of offensive tweets sent in May by Georgia Clark — an English teacher at Carter-Riverside High School in Fort Worth — were protected by the First Amendment, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports.

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Clark, whose Twitter account has since been deleted, is now entitled to return to the classroom with back pay and employment benefits or district officials can fork over one year’s salary.

Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath ruled Monday that the series of offensive tweets sent in May by Georgia Clark (pictured) — an English teacher at Carter-Riverside High School in Fort Worth — were protected by the First Amendment

Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath ruled Monday that the series of offensive tweets sent in May by Georgia Clark (pictured) — an English teacher at Carter-Riverside High School in Fort Worth — were protected by the First Amendment (Forth Worth ISD)

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The teacher was fired in June after seeking assistance from Trump in a barrage of tweets that she said she thought were private messages to the commander-in-chief, Clark later told a district investigator.

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“Mr. President, Fort Worth Independent School District is loaded with illegal students from Mexico,” one message sent on May 17 read. “Carter-Riverside High School has been taken over by them.”

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In another tweet, Clark said her earlier attempts to “remove the illegals” were rebuffed by local and federal authorities in Fort Worth, where 34 percent of residents are Hispanic or Latino, census data shows.

This article originally appeared in the New York Post. For more from the Post, click here.