Rep. Dingell: Republicans' 'arms are being broken' so they won't support impeachment

Democratic Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell said that she was "deeply disturbed" by the findings of House Democrats' impeachment inquiry into President Trump as well as by the arm-breaking of Republicans who agree with her sentiment.

Appearing on "America's Newsroom" with host Sandra Smith, Dingell said that she had talked to a number of Republicans who share a similar mindset.

TRUMP CALLS FOR SENATE TRIAL, SEEKS WHISTLEBLOWER AND SCHIFF AS IMPEACHMENT WITNESSES

"They are being very cautious in their words, their arms are being broken, and I am very disturbed by the undue influence I'm seeing put on Republicans, too," she told Smith.

She said a "number of" Republicans she's spoken with are also "deeply disturbed" but are "worried about what will happen to them" if they break with the president.

This week, Democrats heard testimony from European Union Ambassador Gordon Sondland who said the president's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky constituted a quid pro quo at the "express direction" of the president.

The president later disputed Sondland's testimony in an exclusive interview on "Fox & Friends," calling it "total nonsense."

"It is very clear that the Ukrainian president was -- the word bribe does work -- was being told you're not going to get this aid that you need unless you agree to do this investigation and you do it publicly," Dingell added. "And, we do have evidence that that money was held up."

"And then, we also have evidence that they were trying to say that Ukraine tried to interfere in our elections, not Russia," Dingell added.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

She said that one of the reasons why she has been "fearful about impeachment" is that Republican cabinet members had testified that Russia interfered in the 2016 elections.

"Russia is trying to divide us as a country," she pointed out. "That's documented in the Mueller report."

"Intelligence agency after intelligence agency around the world is saying that they're trying to destabilize democracies," said Dingell.

"We need a president that's going to protect the United States of America, not help destabilize democracies around the world," she concluded.