Online dating app opens bar so people can meet in person

A dating app is about to try a bold, new way of bringing people together: opening a bar.

Bumble, the dating app where women make the first move, is opening a coffee shop/wine bar in New York City. The idea is to create a location designed to make meeting up as comfortable as possible.

Bumble is teaming up with Delicious Hospitality to bring Bumble Brew to life, Bloomberg reports. The SoHo district of Manhattan was chosen for Bumble’s first permanent location because New York City is the app’s most active market. During the day, the location will operate as a coffee shop, and then transition in a wine bar.

Bumble Brew will serve small plates, but no food that would be awkward to eat on a first date.

Bumble Brew will serve small plates, but no food that would be awkward to eat on a first date. (iStock)

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Bumble Brew will offer small plates specifically designed not to embarrass people on a romantic meet-up (or any other type of meeting). That means no chicken wings, messy burgers or spaghetti. Essentially, the plan is to serve foods that people would feel comfortable eating on a first date.

The location will emphasize smaller tables, such as two-tops, for obvious reasons, although there are plans for communal tables.

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Aside from serving food and wine, Bumble Brew will feature event nights, Bloomberg reports. These will include networking events, date nights, chef demos and themed parties.

If the concept works out, Bumble hopes to expand Bumble Brew to other locations.

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This isn’t the only new concept Bumble is introducing. The popular online dating platform is rolling out in June a tool called the Private Detector, which is designed to censor out any inappropriate content. The new feature will be available for Bumble as well as other dating apps and social networks owned by the group, including Badoo, Chappy and Lumen.

The artificial intelligence tool reportedly has a 98 percent accuracy rate in flagging restricted content, including guns and nudity.

This article featured additional reporting by Alexandra Deabler