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‘Happy Days’ star Anson Williams re-records ‘Pump Your Blood’ to ‘I’m Gonna Wash My Hands’ for children

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Anson Williams has released a “corona sing-a-long” for children.

The actor, who played Warren “Potsie” Weber on the hit ‘70s series “Happy Days,” has re-recorded a new version of his popular song “Pump Your Blood” to “I’m Gonna Wash My Hands" amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“Children today are scared and anxious about the coronavirus so I suggested to Jimmy Dunne, the award-winning songsmith and creator of ‘Pump Your Blood,’ to write new words to the song… with a cool video,” the 70-year-old told Fox News. “[This can] empower kids to protect themselves in a fun, effective way. So ‘I’m Gonna Wash My Hands’ was born. Please share and help protect our fabulous kids!”

“Pump Your Blood,” which Williams originally sang on “Happy Days,” is still played in classrooms today to help children learn anatomy.

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“Many moons ago I sang a song on ‘Happy Days’ titled ‘Pump Your Blood’ that became a sensation around the world,” he reflected. “Even today it’s played in thousands of classrooms helping students learn anatomy.”

“None of us would have guessed that the song would take on its own life as the award-winning, long-running commercial for St. Joseph’s Aspirin, The American Heart Association theme and millions of grade school to college kids making a myriad of videos to follow Potsie’s entertaining footsteps to remember the circulatory system,” he added.

Most recently, Williams reunited with former “Happy Days” co-star Don Most in hopes of bringing families together as they practice social distancing during the COVID-19 crisis.

Since playing pals Ralph and Potsie on the hit series, Most and Williams are starred as brothers in the comedy “Harvest Time,” a half-hour show that premiered on YouTube.

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“Harvest Time,” which was written by award-winning playwright Frederick Stroppel, tells the tale of a man on dialysis (Williams) who’s in desperate need of a transplant. His sibling (Most) promised to donate his kidney until he gets a better offer on eBay.

"We are in an unsettling and isolating time in our world right now; people are seeking comfort in familiar faces and turning to on-demand entertainment to take a break from the 24/7 COVID-19 news cycle," executive producer David Levin told Fox News in a statement. "Since there is a halt on the production of most shows and sporting events, we thought fans would appreciate seeing this material from beloved actors."

"We have a little entertainment we thought we would share with you,” Most, 66, shared. “Anson and I got together for the first time since ‘Happy Days’ to shoot this wonderful film."

"We want to wish you a safe time during this unusual period, and we wanted to do something special,” added Williams. "Hey, we're all stuck at home, so we thought now would be a good time to share it. It's kind of a nice April Fool's day gift for our fans. I think you're gonna love it."

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Anson Williams as Potsie, circa 1975.

Anson Williams as Potsie, circa 1975. (Photo by Walt Disney Television via Getty Images Photo Archives/Walt Disney Television via Getty Images)

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Most told Fox News their latest collaboration will especially appeal to longtime fans of “Happy Days,” which aired from 1974 until 1984.

“All the people who grew up watching the show ‘Happy Days’ should get a big kick out of seeing Anson and I together again, especially in a completely different way,” said Most. “It will surely surprise people, but it will definitely entertain, make you laugh, and discuss it with others afterward. Please note it is PG.”

“‘Happy Days’ was successful because it brought a comradely around the TV set, a show that appealed to all ages of a family,” reflected Williams, who also directed “Harvest Time.” “With families sequestered together during our current crisis, Don Most and I thought how great it would be to air a show, starring us for the first time since ‘Happy Days,’ in totally different roles, a chance to bring a bright spot to viewers during this unnerving time… ‘Harvest Time’ is definitely a show that will help forget your troubles and bring back a happy day.”

Back in 2017, Williams told Fox News he didn’t mind being recognized as Potsie.

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(L-R) Ron Howard, Don Most, Marion Ross and Anson Williams.

(L-R) Ron Howard, Don Most, Marion Ross and Anson Williams. (Photo by Rachel Luna/Getty Images)

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“When ‘Happy Days’ first started, I thought timing-wise we might do OK,” he explained. “But I also didn’t realize there was a special chemistry happening on that show. An 'It' factor, a certain magic… It’s a wonderful feeling we still have it around for people to enjoy… [And] I think the secret that made the set so great was our softball team. We would travel all over the world playing benefit games. Most of us were ex-jocks. So it was fantastic in terms of keeping a group of actors together beyond the set.”

And while the show came to an end over 30 years ago, the cast is still close.

“Our relationship is excellent,” he insisted. “I don’t see Ron [Howard] as much because he’s always all over, but we’re in contact. Henry Winkler, we’re in contact. Don Most, he’s 15 minutes away from me. All of us have stayed very, very close. We’re always a phone call away.”