CBS subpoenaed by New York prosecutors over Moonves sexual harassment allegations

CBS is facing a pair of investigations in New York state after being subpoenaed regarding sexual harassment claims against former CEO Les Moonves, other top leaders and workplace culture issues.

The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office and the New York City Commission on Human Rights issued subpoenas to the network regarding its inquiry into the allegations, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing by CBS on Friday, the New York Times reported.

"The Company is cooperating with the ongoing investigation and related inquiries," CBS said in the filing.

The company also said the New York State Attorney General’s Office has requested information on CBS’s own investigation, which is being conducted by two law firms.

The law firms, Covington & Burling and Debevoise & Plimpton, are conducting an investigation into sexual harassment accusations made against Moonves and other former employees, including former anchor Charlie Rose and former "60 Minutes" boss Jeff Fager.

Moonves left the network in disgrace Sept. 9 after the New Yorker magazine reported in two exposes that around a dozen women accused him of sexual harassment going back decades.

That CBS investigation into the allegations is ongoing, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

CBS anchor Gayle King has called on the network to release the probe’s findings.

Moonves is often credited with making CBS the most-watched television network. His departure unfolded as several high-powered entertainment figures have been accused of sexual harassment in the midst of the #MeToo era.

Days after Moonves' dismissal, Fager, the executive producer for “60 Minutes,” was fired. Fager allegedly sent a threatening text message to a CBS reporter who was looking into the sexual harassment allegations against him.

The district attorney’s office opened an investigation after the conduct at CBS came to light, the Times reported.

The Times said the inquiry by the New York state attorney general is to determine whether the company broke any laws by harboring a culture of sexual harassment.

In the filing, CBS also said interim CEO Joe Ianniello will be considered for a permanent position. He will not receive a pay bump, the filing said.

"The company acknowledges and agrees to conclude its formal search process for a permanent Chief Executive Officer in a timely manner and that Mr. Ianniello will be a candidate and will be afforded good faith consideration," the company said.