B. Smith’s husband defends dating while wife battles Alzheimer’s disease, says she gave him permission

The husband of lifestyle guru B. Smith continued to defend himself after he was criticized for dating another woman as his wife battles Alzheimer’s disease.

Dan Gasby, 62, went on The View Thursday to double down on his comments following a profile published in The Washington Post. Gasby had spoken to the newspaper about his girlfriend Alex Lerner, who has a room in the house where Smith and her husband live. He went public with his relationship with Lerner in December.

Gasby told the hosts his wife, a former model and restaurateur, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2014, told him to move on after learning about her diagnosis.

“The View” host Sunny Hostin, who said she’s personal friends of the family, said she “commended” Gasby for “being a caregiver” but said she didn’t understand why Lerner is living at the couple’s home.

“So, did you discuss that while she was able to consent?” Hostin asked.

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“When we got the diagnosis at Mount Sinai, we walked from 101st Street to 92nd Street and she stopped me, put her hand on my arm and she says, ‘I want you to tell the story. I want you to do what we discussed many times…'" Gasby said.

“She said to me, ‘I want you to go on,’” he continued. “I’m not doing anything we didn’t discuss.”

“But did she say, ‘You can have your girlfriend live in our home?’” Hostin pressed.

Gasby said he “could have easily placed her in a facility” but he didn’t.

“So this notion of vows, I’m keeping my vows. Vows are to protect, to care for,” he said.

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Smith and Gasby have been married since 1992.

Gasby spoke about his wife’s battle with Alzheimer’s to Fox News in 2015.

“When you talk to someone and say you have someone in your family who’s a caregiver, and you look each other in the eye, you know exactly what the other person is experiencing,” Gasby said. “When someone says, ‘I can’t imagine,’ the caregiver doesn’t have to imagine — they know.”