Chicago committee votes against ordinance to restrict police raids despite botched 2019 operation

The ordinance is named after Anjanette Young, who was naked when Chicago officers raided the wrong home in 2019

An ordinance that would have restricted Chicago police raids on homes following a botched operation caught on camera in 2019 failed to get enough votes. 

Police raided Anjanette Young's home by mistake in 2019. Officers handcuffed Young naked and allegedly would not let her cover herself up while they searched her home.

The Chicago Public Safety Committee voted 10-4 Thursday against the measure named after Young. 

The proposal would have required Chicago police officers to follow a new set of changes under city law, including banning the use of no-knock warrants and giving residents 30 seconds to answer the door when officers approach a home. 

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Anjanette Young and attorney Keenan Saulter speak regarding developments on Young's case and efforts to work with the City of Chicago. Young was the victim of a botched raid by Chicago police when police entered the wrong home. 

Anjanette Young and attorney Keenan Saulter speak regarding developments on Young's case and efforts to work with the City of Chicago. Young was the victim of a botched raid by Chicago police when police entered the wrong home.  (Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune/TNS/abacapress.com)

Additionally, no officer could seek out a warrant relying solely on the information from an informant, among other criteria. 

The ordinance came after the 2019 raid on Young's home. Body-camera footage showed Young repeatedly telling the officers they had the wrong home. 

Investigators had arrived at her home after an unnamed informant provided her address, claiming a man was illegally possessing a gun at the property. Young, a Black social worker, had returned home from work and was undressing for bed when police barged in.

Chicago police officers park their vehicles on the street near a crime scene. City leaders on Thursday voted against an ordinance that would have restricted Chicago police raids on homes following a botched operation caught video three years ago. 

Chicago police officers park their vehicles on the street near a crime scene. City leaders on Thursday voted against an ordinance that would have restricted Chicago police raids on homes following a botched operation caught video three years ago.  (Chicago Police Department)

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The city tried blocking the video of the raid from being made public. It was later obtained by Young after filing a lawsuit. 

She later reached a $2.9 million settlement with the city.