Chelsea Manning in custody after refusing to testify before federal grand jury in WikiLeaks probe

Chelsea Manning, the former U.S. Army analyst who served seven years in prison for leaking a trove of classified information, was found in contempt of court and taken into custody Friday after refusing to testify before a federal grand jury investigating anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks.

Manning was ordered to jail by U.S. District Judge Claude Hilton after a brief hearing in which Manning confirmed she had no intention of testifying. She told the judge she “will accept whatever you bring upon me.”

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Manning reportedly objects to the secrecy of the grand jury process and said she's already revealed everything she knows during her court-martial. The judge ordered Manning to remain behind bars until she testifies or until the grand jury concludes its work.

"These secret proceedings tend to favor the government," Manning told reporters before her hearing, according to The Washington Post. "I’m always willing to explain things publicly."

Manning’s lawyers have asked she be confined to her home instead due to the medical complications she faces.

Chelsea Manning was ordered to jail Friday, March 8, 2019, for refusing to testify to a Virginia grand jury investigating Wikileaks.

Chelsea Manning was ordered to jail Friday, March 8, 2019, for refusing to testify to a Virginia grand jury investigating Wikileaks. (AP Photo/Matthew Barakat)

The judge, however, concluded U.S. Marshals could appropriately handle her medical care.

Manning told reporters she expected to be jailed and that she had already invoked her First, Fourth and Sixth Amendment protections when she appeared before a grand jury in Alexandria on Wednesday.

Manning served seven years of a 35-year military sentence for leaking military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks before then-President Barack Obama commuted her sentence.

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Prosecutor Tracy McCormick said Manning can easily end the incarceration on the civil charge by testifying.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.