Alligator becomes surprise guest at Florida couple's picnic, 'demolished' food

This spread was just too good for humans to eat.

A Florida couple enjoying a romantic picnic by a lake on the University of Florida campus Monday got an unexpected guest when an alligator ambled over,

"Out of nowhere, a big gator started swimming toward us real fast and we're like, 'Eh, it probably won't get out of the water. We'll just chill, it's fine,' and then it ran up on the bank," Taylor Forte told FOX35.

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Forte, a student at UF, said the reptile went right for the picnic setup she laid out with her fiancé, Trevor, along Lake Alice.

"Demolished all our food, threw up the block of cheese into his mouth, caught it like a dog" she told FOX35.

An alligator demolished a couple's picnic at the University of Florida on Monday.

An alligator demolished a couple's picnic at the University of Florida on Monday. (Courtesy Taylor Forte)

Forte said she was "well aware" there were gators out there and usually enjoyed watching them -- but the couple certainly didn't expect one to want to join the picnic. After eating the food and cracking a bowl full of guacamole, the reptile laid around until Forte's fiance scared it away.

"He did do the bear scare," she said. "He ran up and acted all big, and it hissed and got angry and then it left."

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No one was hurt during the incident and no major damage was reported except for the bowl the gator chomped on. Forte, however, said the incident was "definitely memorable."

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According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissionalligators begin courting in early April and mate in May or June. Aside from roaming farther from their lagoons, warmer temperatures also rev up alligators’ metabolism, making them more active and aggressive as they hunt for prey and also mate.

The FWC recommends not swimming at dusk or dawn — an alligator’s most active hours — keeping animals on a leash and away from water and keeping a safe distance if the large creature suddenly crosses your path -- or picnic.