Alabama man says 'attack squirrel' not on meth, disputing officials' claim

The outlandish tale of a meth-fueled "attack squirrel" just got even nuttier.

The wanted Alabama man who police alleged fed a pet rodent methamphetamine to keep it aggressive has spoken out while on the lam — and he says his pet squirrel is no druggie.

Mickey Paulk, 35, released a Facebook video on Tuesday — alongside a squirrel — after the Limestone County Sheriff's Office said he was wanted on multiple charges including possession of a controlled substance.

Mickey Paulk, left, released a video on Tuesday disputing the local sheriff's office's claims that his squirrel, right, was fed meth to remain aggressive.

Mickey Paulk, left, released a video on Tuesday disputing the local sheriff's office's claims that his squirrel, right, was fed meth to remain aggressive. (Limestone County Sheriff’s Office)

Investigators raided a home in Athens on Monday looking for Paulk after they were told he'd been caring for an "attack squirrel." Paulk wasn't there, but police found another man, who they arrested on drug charges.

They also found the squirrel.

RELATED: ALABAMA MAN ALLEGEDLY FED 'ATTACK SQUIRREL' METH TO KEEP IT AGGRESSIVE: OFFICIALS

It's illegal to have a pet squirrel in Alabama. Officials said they released the critter into the wild, as "there was no safe way to test the squirrel for meth."

But in his video, Paulk appeared to suggest he was somehow reunited with his critter pal — and not because the squirrel came back looking for a fix.

"They said it was a trained attack squirrel in a residence that was on meth," Paulk is heard saying in the video. "You can't give squirrels meth, it would kill them. I'm pretty sure, but I've never tried it."

WARNING: GRAPHIC LANGUAGE

The 35-year-old said the squirrel is just over 10 months old and described his personality as being "an a--hole, he's a mean motherf-----. No doubt."

"But he's not a trained attack squirrel, and he's not on meth, I'm pretty sure," Paulk said. "I better not find out he's on meth anyway. I don't think he likes that s---. The squirrel is safe. The public isn't in danger in any way from the methed-out squirrel in the neighborhood."

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Paulk claimed police invented the story because they were "mad" he wasn't at the home and questioned how he could be charged if he wasn't in the house at the time of the raid, during which deputies said they seized meth, drug paraphernalia and body armor. Paulk said he no longer lived at the home, though, some of his belongings were still there.

He described the situation as a "joke," and assured "the animal lovers out there" the squirrel is doing well.

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"Look at the camera, look at the camera, don't squeak at me," Paulk said at the end of his video as he talked to the supposedly sober squirrel.

Authorities urge anyone with information on the whereabouts of Paulk to contact the sheriff's office at 256-232-0111.