Body of missing Amish child found after Kentucky horse-and-buggy storm accident

Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox.  Sign up here.

The body of the fifth Amish child who perished after a family's horse and buggy was swept away in a Kentucky storm last week was recovered Saturday following a four-day search, authorities said.

“As of this time, the fifth missing Amish child has been recovered,” Bath County Judge-Executive Bobby C. Rogers said in a Facebook post on Saturday. “All Search and Rescue crews are safe, and will be leaving the area now that their mission is done. Please continue to pray for the family. I for one appreciate all efforts made, along with those volunteering to recover this child.”

An Amish mother and her five children were attempting to cross a low-water bridge around 4:45 p.m. on Wednesday in Bath County in the town of Owingsville, about 50 miles east of Lexington, the Lexington Herald-Leader reported.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Four Amish children are dead and one is missing after a horse-drawn buggy overturned and was swept away in floodwaters in Kentucky on Wednesday.

Four Amish children are dead and one is missing after a horse-drawn buggy overturned and was swept away in floodwaters in Kentucky on Wednesday. (Bath County Judge-Executive Bobby Rogers)

Their horse and buggy “was swept away by floodwaters this evening after the heavy rain," Rogers said on Facebook Wednesday.

The mother managed to make it to the bank of the stream, Kentucky State Police said. Four children were found and pronounced dead at the scene by the Bath County Coroner by 1 a.m. Thursday, the Herald-Leader reported. They all died from drowning.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The fifth child's body was found at 11:22 a.m. Saturday. At least 50 members of the National Guard had joined the search, Rogers said. A private funeral for the children --  ages 1 to 12 years old -- will be held by the Hochstetler family, the coroner's office said.

Fox News' Travis Fedschun contributed to this report.