Aaron Rodgers reportedly NFL’s highest-paid player after signing extension with Packers

The Green Bay Packers signed quarterback Aaron Rodgers to a four-year contract extension on Wednesday reportedly worth $134 million, which would make him the NFL’s highest-paid player.

Under the new contact, the two-time league MVP would receive a $57.5 million signing bonus and will have earned more than $80 million by March, NFL.com reported. The Packers announced the deal, but didn’t disclose the terms.

“It’s been an amazing ride the last 13 years; excited to start year 14 knowing that my future is here, in Green Bay, for our 100th season,” Rodgers wrote in an Instagram message. “I’ve grown up in this place, and grown older and a little wiser along the way.

"Looking forward to making some more memorable moments this year, and for years to come.”

The deal makes Rodgers the highest-paid player in the NFL, topping Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan, who agreed to a five-year, $150 million deal in May. Rodgers would make $33.5 million a year while Ryan would make $30 million a year under their new contacts.

Rodgers, who will turn 35 in December, signed a five-year, $110 million extension before the 2013 season kicked off. Rodgers had previously said he wasn’t worried about a new deal getting done even while other quarterbacks surpassed him in average-annual value.

The Cal alum was drafted by the Packers in 2005. After sitting behind Hall-of-Famer Brett Favre for three years, Rodgers played in all 16 games in 2008.

He’s led the Packers to one Super Bowl win since entering the league. He has accrued 38,502 passing yards and 313 touchdowns. He’s widely considered to be one of the league’s top quarterbacks.

Rodgers’ deal comes in the same week Odell Beckham Jr. signed a five-year, $65 million extension with the New York Giants to make him the highest-paid wide receiver in football. The Los Angeles Rams and star defensive lineman Aaron Donald are reportedly “very close” to a mega deal as well.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.