These incoming freshman lawmakers to join Mo Brooks in challenging election on Jan. 6

They plan to object to President-elect Biden's win in six states

A growing number of incoming House GOP freshmen will back Rep. Mo Brooks' effort to object to the certification of the presidential election results on Jan. 6.

Newly elected Reps. Barry Moore of Alabama and Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia were early supporters of Brooks' long-shot effort to challenge the Electoral College slates from a handful of states that President-elect Joe Biden won.

But now more incoming freshmen have joined them, Fox News has learned.

GOP Reps.-elect Lauren Boebert of Colorado, Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, Burgess Owens of Utah, Yvette Herrell of New Mexico, Dr. Ronny Jackson of Texas, Bob Good of Virginia, Jerry Carl of Alabama and Andrew Clyde of Georgia will be supporting Brooks' effort, for a total of at least 10 incoming reps, Fox News has confirmed. This does not include current members who have said they will also object, like Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga.

New members of Congress are sworn in on Jan. 3.

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Rep.-elect Andrew Clyde, R-Ga., stands out in the incoming House freshman class because he already got a law enacted to curb the powers of the IRS. (Marisa Schultz/Fox News)

Rep.-elect Andrew Clyde, R-Ga., stands out in the incoming House freshman class because he already got a law enacted to curb the powers of the IRS. (Marisa Schultz/Fox News) (Marisa Schultz/Fox News)

"I plan to object," Clyde, a Georgia gun store owner, told Fox News. "It's clear to me that there have been serious allegations made under oath of the mishandling of multiple states’ absentee ballots resulting in violations of Georgia and other states’ election laws."

He added: "These allegations deserve to be reviewed in accordance with the Constitution and the due process upon which our country was founded. The American people deserve to hear that evidence presented in Congress, and I plan to ensure that happens."

Good told Fox News he'll join others in challenging the election results because "there remain significant unanswered questions about the constitutional integrity of the voting process."

Rep.-elect Bob Good, R-Va., in an interview with Fox News slammed Democrats over their opposition to recent bills Republicans have introduced that would have limited abortion.

Rep.-elect Bob Good, R-Va., in an interview with Fox News slammed Democrats over their opposition to recent bills Republicans have introduced that would have limited abortion. (Bob Good)

Championing this effort is Brooks, an Alabama Republican, who believes President Trump has been the victim of massive voter fraud and election theft. He told "Fox and Friends" Monday there are "dozens" of members of the House that will sponsor and co-sponsor formal objections to Electoral College votes in at least six states: Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Arizona and Nevada.

Carl said he'll "certainly" challenge electors from such states when the opportunity arises. "President Trump has had our backs, and now is the time for us to have his as he rightfully pursues challenges to election fraud," Carl said.

Boebert said all Republicans should join the effort or "prepare for a primary election" in 2022.

"The American people deserve secure and fair elections," Boebert said. "Unfortunately, the 2020 election was neither of those things."

Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., campaigning this past October.

Rep.-elect Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., campaigning this past October. (Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images, File)

Brooks said Monday the "real issue" remains whether any senators will join the effort. 

Congressional rules require a House member and senator to simultaneously challenge a state’s electoral slate when they jointly convene on Jan. 6. 

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Senate GOP leaders are against this effort to challenge Biden's win, with Senate Majority Whip John Thune, R-S.D., telling reporters earlier this month that the election has been litigated and it was time to move on. "I don’t think it’s good for the country," Thune said.

If there is a House and Senate member appealing a state’s slate of electors, the joint session of Congress is dissolved and the House and Senate meet separately for two hours to debate a contested state’s electoral vote.

Each body then votes whether to accept or reject that state’s slate of electoral votes. Then the House and Senate reconvene in the joint session.

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A state’s slate of electoral votes is only tossed if both the House and Senate vote to do so. With Democrats controlling the House and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., acknowledging Biden's win, it's unlikely there would be enough votes to reject any state's certification.

Rep.-elect Barry Moore, R-Ala.

Rep.-elect Barry Moore, R-Ala.

Moore, an early backer of the effort, said he's excited to see other House members come on board and stand up for election integrity. Now, he said, it's time for senators to join them.

"Without their support, we can’t correct the terrible inconsistencies within the states that violated their own requirements for fair and free elections," Moore told Fox News. "This is not just about President Trump. It’s about the will of the American people."

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Unlike longtime politicians, Greene said the freshman class is showing "more boldness." "We are different," Greene said. "We all ran during a time where we aren't afraid to fight."

Rep.-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene speaks to Trump supporters. (Twitter/@mtgreenee)

Rep.-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene speaks to Trump supporters. (Twitter/@mtgreenee) (Twitter/@mtgreenee)

Trump has repeatedly alleged he beat Biden and that there was widespread voter fraud. But states have stood by their results and courts have rejected Trump's legal claims in dozens of cases. Attorney General William Barr, who has since stepped down, said last month his Justice Department has not seen fraud on the kind of scale that could flip the election. 

Biden won the Electoral College vote 306 to 232. In addition, he won the popular vote by a margin of more than 7 million votes.

Fox News' Chad Pergram contributed to this report.