Kirsten Gillibrand says it's on big Democratic donors if they're angry about Al Franken

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., stood by her decision to call for former Sen. Al Franken's, D-Minn., resignation, telling "The View" on Wednesday she would be able to maintain voters' support even as some influential Democratic donors refused to help her 2020 bid.

“I think there are a few influential and powerful Democratic donors and elites who are angry about it," she told co-host Joy Behar. "But if they’re going to be angry about me standing up for women who were groped, that’s on them.”

Gillibrand's campaign has acknowledged that Democratic donors have retaliated about the New York senator given her decision to call for Franken's resignation amid multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

'THE VIEW' CO-HOST JOY BEHAR BLASTS TRUMP OVER MUELLER REPORT OMISSION: 'THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE NAIL IN THE COFFIN'

“There’s no question that the first quarter was adversely impacted by certain establishment donors — and many online — who continue to punish Kirsten for standing up for her values and for women,” a campaign memo read.

WHO IS KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND? 5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE NEW YORK SENATOR AND 2020 CANDIDATE

Gillibrand, like Behar, missed Franken but, as she said during a town hall in Iowa last week, she didn't believe she could "carry his water any farther" once "credible allegations" had surfaced.

"He was someone who really served us well on the Judiciary Committee and was a strong senator but the truth is that he had eight credible allegations against him," she previously said.

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., resigned in 2018 after multiple women accused him of sexual misconduct.

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., resigned in 2018 after multiple women accused him of sexual misconduct. (Reuters/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Behar worried that without those large donations, Gillibrand's campaign faced an uneven field with Republicans who would "play dirty." “I just feel like you’re playing in an uneven field with the Republicans because they will play dirty and we will not on the Democratic side, and that could kill us," she said.

Behar also asked Gillibrand about accusations against former Vice President Joe Biden, who is expected to announce his 2020 candidacy on Thursday. Gillibrand responded by appearing to sidestep the question and saying "I'm sure it's a question voters will want to ask him about — and that's his job."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Biden, in response to concerns about "inappropriate touching," said that he would be more "mindful" about respecting people's personal space.

"Politics to me has always been about making connections, but I will be more mindful about respecting personal space in the future. That’s my responsibility and I will meet it," he said.