Sister of 9/11 victim travels to Gitmo, demands justice as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed case drags on

Lorraine Arias-Beliveau, who lost her brother in the 9/11 terror attacks, said her continuous visits to Guantanamo Bay for the trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed has made her feel as if she's been waterboarded for the past 18 years, as she continues to seek justice.

"It was surreal to be sitting in the rear of the courtroom to actually see these men physically," she said on "Fox & Friends" Wednesday.  "He was glad he did it for jihad. And he turned around and was looking at us, staring and he made eye-to-eye contact with me. So I just stared... and was holding up a picture of my brother. And in his name, as long as I have breath in me, I will take any opportunity I have to speak out.

"And for 18 years after the terror the people of New York faced, the terror, fear, and death it's as if we've been waterboarded 18 years -- with the continuance of the preliminaries to this trial," Arias-Beliveau continued. "My mother died never seeing justice for her son. My dad's 92. And I can only hope that in January when they start the trials again, that he can see some type of justice in his lifetime."

She also condemned the slowness of the trial and said America failed to protect its citizens and now they're failing to dole out justice.

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"Our country failed to protect us. Now they're failing to bring us justice. Is Gitmo just a sanctuary state?" she asked. "Nuremberg was settled in a year. It's a military trial. And then to hijack the trial under the pretense of a federal trial -- or to bring these people back into our country is a disgrace."

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Arias-Beliveau shared some kind words about her brother's character, before describing the heroism he displayed on that fateful day before his death.

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"We were a large family. I was the oldest of six children. He was the youngest. He was bright. He was funny -- very quick-witted," she said earlier in the interview. "And always successful."

Arias has been hailed as a hero -- he was seen outside Tower 2 helping firemen and law enforcement usher people to safety.

"We had mixed reports because my other brother had called him... and he personally was reported as escorting 200 people out of the building," Arias-Beliveau added. "He made many trips in and out. And then he fell in the front when the second tower came down, he was in front of the building, helping the policemen help people get out."