New York resident describes living in coronavirus quarantine's 'containment zone'

New Rochelle resident Tamar Weinberg explained Friday that her New York community has come together under coronavirus (COVID-19) quarantine.

In an interview with "The Ingraham Angle's" Laura Ingraham, Weinberg described life before and after the implementation of the country's first coronavirus containment zone.

New Rochelle, a suburb north of New York City, has transformed into a virtual ghost town after Governor Andrew Cuomo imposed a one-mile "containment area" around the epicenter of the outbreak in the state.

On Thursday, National Guard troops arrived in the area to help clean public spaces and deliver food to people who are in quarantine.

NEW ROCHELLE TURNS INTO GHOST TOWN AMID CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK BEFORE NATIONAL GUARD'S ARRIVAL

Weinberg said she was a member of the synagogue where the community spread first began.

"I was actually a member of the synagogue. Where, I guess, you would consider the community spread," she said. "And, as a community, we self-identified as members who have basically shared a building with someone who had the first positive case. And, as a result, about 700 of us decided we are going to stay home."

A solitary woman checks her cellphone on a normally busy North Avenue inside what's called a "containment area" in New Rochelle, N.Y., Wednesday, March 11, 2020. State officials on Tuesday called for closing schools, houses of worship and any other spaces were large numbers of people gather within a 1-mile radius (1.6 kilometers) of a point near a synagogue where an infected person had attended events. (AP Photo/Chris Erhmann)

A solitary woman checks her cellphone on a normally busy North Avenue inside what's called a "containment area" in New Rochelle, N.Y., Wednesday, March 11, 2020. State officials on Tuesday called for closing schools, houses of worship and any other spaces were large numbers of people gather within a 1-mile radius (1.6 kilometers) of a point near a synagogue where an infected person had attended events. (AP Photo/Chris Erhmann)

Weinberg said that since then, she has not been able to leave her property.

"Yeah, so quarantine by definition: we basically have to stay in our properties. We cannot leave. We cannot go on our sidewalks," she continued further. "So, thankfully we have an amazing, amazing community."

"And, I have to say," she told Ingraham. "We're tremendously grateful [for] all the help people in the New Rochelle community and beyond who have come to support us during this difficult time."

Since the initial spread, Weinberg said the original coronavirus patient has been improving, but the fear around the virus, and debate about how it spreads, is still prevalent.

A new study, published in the medRxiv depository, suggests that COVID-19 can remain in the air for up to three hours and live on surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to three days.

The research also notes that the virus can remain on copper surfaces for four hours and cardboard for up to 24 hours. The research found it could stay on stainless steel and plastic for anywhere between two and three days.

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"You know the perspective that I see is that people are actually coming to our houses like, for example, postal workers, they're wearing masks," she added. "That's where the fear is coming from. There are a lot of misconceptions about what is going on right now."

Weinberg said that she hopes to be out of quarantine by Sunday.