Media spread 'misinformation' about now-dismissed corruption charges, ex-Illinois lawmaker says

A Republican former congressman from Illinois claimed Thursday night that the media helped spread "misinformation" about corruption charges against him that were ultimately dropped.

Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schockwho resigned from office in 2015, told Martha MacCallum on "The Story" that he legally used money from his congressional office budget to decorate the space.

"There was never any money spent on my apartment," he said of claims that some funds were misused.

"There's been so much misinformation by the press because they've been so eager to write about a corrupt politician," Shock said. "The reality is there's only one reason the Justice Department would drop a 24-count felony indictment: It's because I didn't commit 24 felony counts. I didn't commit 'a' felony."

PROSECUTORS AGREE TO DROP CHARGES AGAINST DISGRACED FORMER GOP REP. AARON SCHOCK IF HE PAYS BACK IRS

In regard to the allegations, Schock said much of the controversy stemmed from mileage records lawmakers and their staffs fill out for travel reimbursement.

"I'm a member of Congress, I'm running all over the 205 towns I represent. I never filled out a mileage statement in my life," he said, adding he could have done a better job overseeing his staff's official work in that regard.

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He called the case against him a "complete waste of taxpayer money" and a "witch hunt," adding he agreed to pay back the tens of thousands of dollars he had billed the government for mileage.

Looking ahead, the 38-year-old said he is not expecting to pursue elected office again at this time.

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On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Matthew Kennelly ordered the formal dismissal of charges against Schock.

One of the ex-lawmaker's actions that drew scrutiny was when he decorated his office in the style of the "Downton Abbey" TV series.

Under the deal, Schock agreed to repay his campaign committees $68,000 and work with the IRS to determine how much he owes in taxes for income he didn't report between 2010 and 2015.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.