Cuomo's book touting 'leadership' during pandemic released just before huge spike in COVID cases, pundit notes

Cuomo often has praised NY's response to outbreak despite controversies

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo took an early victory lap touting his response to the coronavirus pandemic with the release of his book last year, but as the nation faces another surge of cases, perhaps it was ill-timed. 

Cuomo, a Democrat, raised eyebrows when he announced that he was already writing a memoir about how he handled the outbreak in New York. The book, titled "American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic," was released in October. 

However, as The Blaze's Stu Burguiere pointed out on Tuesday, New York was hit with a major spike in coronavirus cases following the release of Cuomo's book. 

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According to John Hopkins University's Coronavirus Resource Center, New York was averaging 1374 new coronavirus cases per day by Oct. 13, the day Cuomo's "Leadership" book was released. 

As of Jan. 4, New York was averaging a whopping 14,089 new cases per day. 

Cuomo received high praise from the media in the early months of the pandemic, particularly for his perceived bluntness at his daily press conferences. 

However, much of the media have overlooked Cuomo's shortcomings, specifically his controversial nursing home policy that critics believe is responsible for thousands of deaths among senior citizens in his state. 

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Cuomo has faced intense scrutiny over an order he issued back in late March that forced nursing homes to accept patients who tested positive for coronavirus, despite testing deficiencies for both residents and staff. Cuomo signed an executive order on May 11 reversing the policy, stopping hospitals from sending infected patients back to nursing homes and ramping up testing for staff. 

During that period, roughly 6,326 coronavirus patients were admitted in New York nursing homes, according to the state's own health department. Reports have shown that anywhere between 6,400 and 6,700 nursing home residents have died, but The Associated Press suggested in August that due to underreporting, the actual death toll could be higher than 11,000.