Russian chefs strip on social media to protest strict lockdown rules

That’s one way to get attention.

Chefs in Russia are taking to social media to protest the country’s coronavirus lockdown rules. Since they’ve been stripped of their income, they decided to strip out of their clothes as well.

Chefs and other restaurant workers in Russia stripped and posted photos to Facebook to protest the country's strict lockdown rules.

Chefs and other restaurant workers in Russia stripped and posted photos to Facebook to protest the country's strict lockdown rules. (Funkyfood_11 via Reuters)

Hundreds of workers in Russia’s food service industry participated in the movement, Reuters reports. Bar, restaurant and café employees all shared photographs of themselves with items such as plates, cups, barstools and other restaurant items carefully placed in front of their private parts.

According to these workers, they simply want to be able to reopen their restaurants and get back to work.

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In March, Russian President Vladimir Putin shut down all businesses except for food stores and pharmacies when he implemented strict lockdown rules across the country. The move was made to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Now, some areas of the country are starting to lift those restrictions. In Moscow, shopping malls, book stores and beauty stores have reopened. Outside terraces for cafes and restaurants will be allowed to reopen in late June.

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In many parts of Russia, indoor restaurants and bars remain closed, putting a significant financial burden on the business owners and their employees.

Arthur Galaychyuk, owner of the Relab Family bar chain in Kazan, posted, “We are naked because we are left with nothing.” According to Reuters, Galaychyuk’s 20 employees also participated in the campaign.

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“We don’t want to stage a strip show or to fool around, we only want one thing — to work!” wrote a chef from Siberia named Pavel. “We don’t pose more of a risk than supermarkets, shopping malls, hair salons or public transport.”