'Sex and the City' creator Candace Bushnell says Chris Noth introduced her to Mr. Bigger: 'He’s a new type'

“Sex and the City” creator Candace Bushnell says it was Chris Noth, who famously played Mr. Big in the hit HBO series, who introduced her to Mr. Bigger.

“I actually call him M.N.B. — my new boyfriend,” the 60-year-old told Fox News. “He’s a new type, the new boyfriend, and he’s Mr. Bigger because he’s nicer and kinder, I think, than Mr. Big. But Chris Noth, a long time ago, he was out with a friend of his. We met and I thought, ‘God, this guy’s really very interesting.’ But he had a girlfriend.”

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“And then I went to a party — he was single and I was single, and this was a couple of years ago, and we started talking and we hit it off. And so we started dating,” the best-selling author continued. “I think we were maybe on our third date when Chris Noth called… He was like, ‘Bushnell, I can’t believe it, you’re going out with one of my best friends!’ So I can never get away from Mr. Big.”

(L-R) Writer Candace Bushnell with actors Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth.

(L-R) Writer Candace Bushnell with actors Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth. (Dave Allocca/DMI/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)

The best-selling author, whose book would inspire the hit HBO series starring Sarah Jessica Parker, recently released “Is There Still Sex and the City?”. Her newest book follows a group of female friends as they navigate midlife dating and relationships in New York City. Like with her first book, Bushnell draws from her own personal experience.

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But we couldn’t help but wonder: Can women today still relate to “Sex and the City”? Absolutely, said Bushnell. Like a pair of Manolos, Bushnell said her original tale will never go out of style.

Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth during Season Premiere Party for "Sex and the City" in Los Angeles, California, United States.

Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth during Season Premiere Party for "Sex and the City" in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic, Inc.)

“It’s certainly not too dated for women to enjoy and it’s still a huge hit,” she explained. “Really, girls in their late teens and women in their 20s come up to me and they watch it, they binge-watch it. I think that it’s almost really like a rite of passage. And the fact is that they still really relate to it because even though people maybe ghost you today, and there are all different terms, being broken up with is still being broken up with.”

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“So the emotions are still the same and so it does still very much resonate, I find, with young women,” Bushnell continued. “And I found that [my new book] is also resonating with young women as well because they’re interested in seeing what life really is like. As  opposed to, ‘Hey, what’s the fairy tale?’ Because young women today know that the fairy tale isn’t really that true.”

"Sex and the City" cast from left to right: Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon and Kim Cattrall.

"Sex and the City" cast from left to right: Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon and Kim Cattrall. (AP)

One of the subjects Bushnell tackles in her book is a subject that has made its way on social media and reality TV shows — getting work done in hopes of turning back time.

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The New York Post previously reported Bushnell nearly shelled out thousands of dollars for the Mona Lisa, or “a vaginal laser-rejuvenation treatment that has become a cultish obsession among the city’s most privileged.”

Actress Sarah Jessica Parker films "Sex and the City" on March 10, 1998, at Madison Avenue in New York City.

Actress Sarah Jessica Parker films "Sex and the City" on March 10, 1998, at Madison Avenue in New York City. (Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images)

But readers shouldn’t expect any less from Bushnell, who was just as frank with us as she was in her New York Observer column titled “Sex and the City,” which resulted in the series that aired from 1998 until 2004.

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“I think there’s pressure on everybody to look younger,” said Bushnell. “And there certainly is pressure on 50-something, 60-something and 70-something women to look younger. Part of that is because we can… In the past, we just didn’t have these tools, and people do take advantage of them. What’s interesting is how many young women do Botox and plastic surgery.

“So the reality is if we have tools to make us look younger, there are many people who will take advantage of these methods and techniques. And that, in turn, feels like it puts pressure on everybody else… But the interesting thing about middle age is that there’s also freedom where there’s an acceptance… So there are both sides to that coin.”

Candace Bushnell says fans of "Sex and the City" will easily fall head over Manolos for her newest release.

Candace Bushnell says fans of "Sex and the City" will easily fall head over Manolos for her newest release.

But those expecting a new “Sex and The City” film shouldn’t hold their breath.

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In November 2018, Parker told Fox News that while she knows the next chapter to the popular franchise, it may not be available any time soon.

“I know where it is,” said the 54-year-old at the time about where she saw “Sex and the City” and its heroine heading. “I read the script. It’s fantastic… It was great, it was beautiful. But I sadly can’t say. But I know where [Carrie] was headed and I know where all [the characters] were headed. It was wonderful.”