DC men accused of posing as fake feds were 'tipped off' to investigation, shipped evidence: Filing

Prosecutors state that Taherzadeh was 'tipped off' about the investigation and attempted to ship evidence out of the apartment

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Two Washington, D.C. men accused of posing as federal agents were "tipped off" about the federal investigation into their scheme just one day before they were arrested, and "shipped" evidence out of their apartment, a Sunday court filing by prosecutors states.

Arian Taherzadeh, 40, and Haider Ali, 35, were both arrested on April 6 at a luxury apartment in the Navy Yard area of Washington, D.C during a multi-federal government agency raid of several apartment units. They were charged with false impersonation of a federal officer in a U.S. District Court on Thursday.

Federal prosecutors filed a motion for detention on April 8, arguing that Ali is a flight risk and Taherzdeh could attempt to obstruct justice.

Magistrate Judge Michael Harvey said on Friday that he needs more details about Ali's travel history to Pakistan and Iran, additional details about "United Special Police LLC," which Taherzadeh allegedly controls, as well as detailed information about Taherzadeh's history as a deputized special police officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C.

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A Sunday court filing by prosecutors reveals that Taherzadeh was "tipped off" about the federal investigation, and attempted to conceal evidence by "shipping it out of their apartment complex."

When the Federal Bureau of Investigations and multiple other federal government agencies executed their search warrant on April 6, shipping materials and UPS labels were found, which raised a concern that evidence was being shipped out of the apartment, according to the filing.

One day after the search warrant was executed, April 7, prosecutors state that a Secret Service member who Taherzadeh provided a "rent-free penthouse" allegedly received a package sent through UPS Next Day Air with a return label stating "USSP," and an address that corresponded to Taherzadeh and Ali's apartment complex.

The package contained a number of smaller boxes where Sauer and Glock firearm cases were found, and correspond to the "apparent purchases of a P365 9MM Sig Sauer, a P365 XL 9MM Sig Sauer 9MM , and a Glock 19 Generation 4 9MM," according to the filing.

The firearm case for the P365 Sig Sauer 9MM also held three ammunition magazines, which prosecutors say appears to be a high-capacity magazine.

Prosecutors state that the federal government was "conducting constant surveillance" of the men when the items were shipped, and believe that they could have been aware that the government was keeping a close eye on them, and believed that shipping evidence was a way to "remove evidence without the Government’s detection."

WASHINGTON D.C. MEN WHO ALLEGEDLY POSED AS FEDERAL AGENTS HAD STOCKPILE OF WEAPONS, NEW FILING SHOWS

Additionally, the package shipped to the Secret Service member also contained a cigar case with four cigars, which prosecutors say "is consistent with the prior pattern and practice of providing federal law enforcement agents with gifts and items of value."

Prosecutors also attempted to answer a question from Harvey, asking if Taherzadeh and Ali conducted business as Special Police Officers, which they say is "a resounding no."

The men were denied commissions to work as armed Special Police Officers, prosecutors state, and said that their activities went beyond the scope of Special Police Officer authority even if they held that position.

Ammunition magazines recovered during the search of Ali’s Glock 19 and Taherzadeh’s Sig Sauer are "illegal, high-capacity magazines," prosecutors also allege.

DC MEN WHO ALLEGEDLY POSED AS FEDERAL AGENTS UNDER SCRUTINY FOR POSSIBLE FOREIGN TIES

Federal law enforcement agencies enter an apartment building in Washington, D.C.

Federal law enforcement agencies enter an apartment building in Washington, D.C. (Fox News/Kelly Laco)

A former U.S. Marine who the men attempted to "recruit" told the government that he observed illegal weapons, which include "an AR-15/M4 variant automatic rifle with an illegal suppressor that had also been modified to be an illegal automatic weapon, and an AR Pistol with a modified brace consistent with the firearm parts recovered during the execution of the search warrant."

Prosecutors argue that the release of Taherzadeh and Ali would "endanger the community and risk their flight from justice and obstruction of critical evidence."

On April 6, federal law enforcement officers recovered multiple firearms as well as ammunition while executing a search warrant. According to a court filing by federal prosecutors on April 7, "numerous electronic devices" were also found, including a "significant" amount of surveillance equipment, 30 hard drives, a machine that creates and programs Personal Identification Verification cards, and blank cards with chips.

Federal prosecutors filed a motion for detention on Friday morning, showing some of what the Federal Bureau of Investigations and other agencies found when they executed the search warrant on Wednesday, which includes a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider.

Federal prosecutors filed a motion for detention on Friday morning, showing some of what the Federal Bureau of Investigations and other agencies found when they executed the search warrant on Wednesday, which includes a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Department of Justice)

Passports belonging to Ali were also recovered during the raid, which show two visas from Iran. Prosecutors say that the first visa authorized travel to Iran from July 31, 2019 through October 28, 2019, and the second from October 28, 2019 through January 25, 2020. The passports also contain visas from Pakistan.

Federal prosecutors also allege that Ali told two witnesses that he has some type of connection with the Pakistani Intelligence Service, the Inter-Services Intelligence. 

The scheme by the two men began to fall apart when a United States Postal Inspector arrived at their apartment complex to investigate an alleged assault involvingcan w a United States Postal Service carrier, according to prosecutors.

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The case was eventually handed to the Federal Bureau of Investigations after the men identified themselves as employees of the Department of Homeland Security who worked on a special task force related to the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. They used their fake law enforcement positions to integrate with legitimate federal agents who they gave gifts, prosecutors allege.

Prosecutors allege that the individuals "compromised" Secret Service personnel who have access to the White House "by lavishing gifts upon them, including rent-free living."

The detention hearing will continue on Monday afternoon.