Disney World reportedly uses a secret shade of paint to camouflage 'less than exciting' park elements

The folks who manage Disney World reportedly have a number of secret ways to keep the magic of the park alive for guests, and one of them involves a particular shade of green. Dubbed the "Go Away Green" or "no-see-um-green", it is used throughout the park without visitors even realizing.

The particular shade of green is described as grey-green with a tinge of blue.

According to Mental Floss, the color is used on items that are less than exciting and not part of the experience, such as bins, signs and fences and even backstage areas.

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This helps them to fade into the landscape and not be easily seen, therefore capturing the illusion of the park.

Disney expert Gavin Doyle told Business Insider: "The goal of this color is to cause the object to fade into your color spectrum so that your eye will miss it completely."

The color is designed by "Imagineers", part of the Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI) team who create all of the designs and themes in the Disney franchise including cruises, attractions, resorts and theme parks.

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Reddit user red_pantz, who claims to document paint colors for Disney, explained how "Go Away Green" is not just one color.

He explained: "Disney uses a few different colors to get buildings to fade into the foliage surrounding it (sic).

"It has a lot to do with what the building is blending into - ivy differs from oak, which differs from shrubs, etc.

"For example, if you need an aged copper finish, you know that Color #12345 is the base, Color #23456 is the substrate, and Color #34567 is the patina."

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Sun Online Travel recently revealed a secret spot near Sleeping Beauty's castle, where guests can meet the characters without the crowds. If you go there around 15 minutes before a show, you'll have the best opportunity to see the most number of characters.

This story originally appeared on The Sun. Read more content from The Sun here.