José Altuve has World Series in mind even after Astros' sign-stealing scandal

Houston Astros second baseman José Altuve remained confident Saturday when discussing the fallout from Major League Baseball’s punishment for the team stealing signs during the 2017 season.

Altuve spoke for the first time about and had one thing on his mind: World Series.

“Believe me, in the end of the year, everything will be fine,” Altuve told reporters at the team’s fan fest, as ESPN reported. “We're going to be in the World Series again. People don't believe it, we will. We will. We made it last year, we were one game away of winning it all.”

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Altuve got wrapped up in the scandal earlier in the week.

His walk-off home run in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series to send the team to the World Series in October came under fire because he told teammates not to rip off his jersey during the celebration. Altuve argued to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal that he was shy, but critics said he was hiding a device under his jersey. Altuve denied wearing any devices.

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“You know, we all know that some people made that up,” Altuve said. “And, like I said, the best thing to happen to me was the MLB investigate that and they didn't find something.”

Altuve and Alex Bregman were the only players from the 2017 World Series-winning team who were at the fan fest. While Bregman essentially declined to comment on the fallout, Altuve remained focused on the future.

“I have two options. One is, cry, and one is, go down and play the game and [perform] and help my team,” Altuve said. “You know what one I am going to do.”

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The MLB suspended A.J. Hinch and Jeff Luhnow for a year over the scheme. Houston subsequently fired Hinch and Luhnow and have been looking for a new manager and general manager.

Alex Cora and Carlos Beltran were also named in the report as key figures who set up the system. Cora was a bench coach at the time and Beltran was an outfielder. Cora and Beltran were both dismissed from their managerial jobs by the Boston Red Sox and New York Mets respectively.