Tinder settles age discrimination lawsuit for $17.3 million

Hookup app Tinder has reached a $17.3 million settlement with California-based users aged 30 and up who alleged that the service charged them twice as much as their 29-and-under counterparts.

The class-action lawsuit, led by plaintiff Lisa Kim, arose after Kim realized in 2015 that she was paying $19.99 for Tinder Plus, which provides users with advanced features such as unlimited “likes” and a passport feature to swipe anywhere in the world. Users aged 29 and younger were paying only $9.99 per month.

Tinder defended its decision to charge older users more by saying that they have more money to burn.

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“During our testing we’ve learned that younger users are just as excited about Tinder Plus but are more budget constrained and need a lower price to pull the trigger,” Tinder said in 2015.

Under the settlement, each member of the 230,000-strong class will receive 50 in-app “Super Likes” (worth $11.5 million), with the option to claim another 25.

Click here to read more of this story at The New York Post, where it was originally published.