Legendary sports broadcaster Vin Scully, 92, shares how he's social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic

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Vin Scully has been out of the Los Angeles Dodgers broadcast booth for three seasons, but he still manages to connect with fans in his hometown and all across the country.

Dodger Stadium still shows various promos and videos of Scully, who is beloved in Los Angeles and around the baseball world. And in a time of connection and comfort, the 92-year-old Scully, who had one of the most distinguished voices during his time in sports broadcasting, offered his thoughts on the coronavirus pandemic the world is currently facing.

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“We’re like everybody else, we’re hunkered down,” Scully told the Los Angeles Times on Sunday. “But for me, I’ve been hunkered down ever since we hung things up at the end of ‘16, I’m very accustomed to being at home …it’s that old line, if it wasn’t for doctor appointments we wouldn’t have a social life at all.”

Scully, who sheltered with his wife, Sandi, in their Los Angeles home, said that they are hanging in tough, and he feels fine. However, Scully is suffering emotionally like many others who are in quarantine because of the virus.

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“Once in a while one of our children can come over and visit … we have a pretty large master bedroom, so they can sit quite a few feet away just to say hello,” Scully told the newspaper. “But there’s no hugging and kissing and nothing like that … we’re trying very hard to follow the rules … the kids are scared that they will bring in something that will just blow me away … it’s a very difficult time to go without hugs, you know?”

Despite all of the negativity the world is currently facing, Scully sees light at the end of the tunnel. He believes this will bring people closer to their faith, and he thinks other good things will come out of this.

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“I think people are especially jumping at the opportunity to help each other,” he told the newspaper. “I believe that’s true, so that’s kind of heartwarming, with all of it, it brings out some goodness in people, and that’s terrific.

“All those first responders, people putting their lives on the lines, and we’re cheering that they’ll score a touchdown or hit a home run, whatever phrase you want to use, so I’m sure there’s a lot of praying going on and I’m all for it.”