Warren remains optimistic despite financial woes: ‘I’ve been winning unwinnable fights my whole life’

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., whose campaign may be in jeopardy due to financial woes, remained confident in her ability to overcome the odds, not just in the Democratic primary race, but the general election in November.

If Warren is able to emerge victorious from the large Democratic field, she would have her work cut out for her in unseating an incumbent president. She believes she is up to the task.

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“You know, I hear people talk about the race against Donald Trump may be unwinnable; I’ve been winning unwinnable fights all my life,” Warrant told ABC’s “This Week,” pointing to how this would not be her first time unseating a GOP opponent who was already in office.

“I won the fight to take back a Senate seat from a popular incumbent Republican. In fact, I’m the only one in this race now who has beaten an incumbent Republican any time in the last thirty years,” she said.

That statement is true, given its careful wording. Former vice president Joe Biden defeated incumbent Republican J. Caleb Boggs in order to become a U.S. senator from Delaware, but that was in 1972, 38 years ago. Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., defeated an incumbent Republican in 2012, but Delaney announced at the end of January that he was no longer running in the 2020 presidential race.

Warren claimed that past achievements -- such as establishing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and helping get the CEO of Wells Fargo fired -- show that she can pull off a win.

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“The way I look at this is that people say 'oh these races are unwinnable' or 'that person can’t win,' right up until you jump in the fight, you persist, and you win. That’s what I’m gonna do," she insisted.

Warren, who finished third in the Iowa caucuses, acknowledged that in order to cut costs her campaign has had to scale back advertising spending in South Carolina and Nevada, which each have contests later this month. Warren has stated she is avoiding big-money donors for her presidential campaign, despite accepting contributions from the wealthy in previous races.

"I believe in democracy and that's why I decided that I was going to build this as a grassroots movement and make this system better," she said, claiming that billionaires "shouldn't own a bigger piece of our democracy."

Warren has blasted former South Bend, Ind. mayor Pete Buttigieg for courting wealthy donors. Buttigieg has defended the practice following criticism from Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., claiming his campaign is about inclusion.

"I’m building a campaign that’s not defined by who we reject. It’s defined by belonging, it’s defined by inclusion. It’s defined by pulling together the coalition to get the job done," he told "Fox News Sunday."

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Warren said if courting the rich is the only way to win, the country is in trouble.

"Here's the thing," she said. "If it's going to take sucking up to billionaires or being a billionaire to get the Democratic nomination to run for president, then all I can say is buckle up, America, because our government is going to work even better for billionaires and even worse for everyone else."