Meryl Streep's 'toxic masculinity' critique a 'step out of' Hollywood 'echo chamber of conformity,' Concha says

Meryl Streep stepped outside the Hollywood "echo chamber of conformity" when she critiqued "toxic masculinity," according to Joe Concha.

Concha, The Hill media reporter, claimed Friday on "Tucker Carlson Tonight" the Oscar-nominated actress "stepped outside that lane."

"In Hollywood is a lot like our media. It's an echo chamber of conformity. If you step outside that lane ... then you probably will be ostracized," Concha claimed.

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However, he added he thought Streep, who has been a fixture in Hollywood for decades, is considered "royalty" and can speak on such matters without heavy criticism.

"At this point, who is going to say something to Meryl Streep?" he asked.

Host Tucker Carlson noted Streep didn't deny the existence of such "toxic masculinity" but instead claimed such a phenomenon is not unique to a single gender.

"That's so obviously true, it makes you think, 'well, maybe the things you are not allowed to say are the truest things'," Carlson claimed.

Streep appeared in a panel alongside her “Big Little Lies” co-stars Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, and Nicole Kidman ahead of the HBO series’ Season 2 premiere. The group was talking about the breakout hit series when Kidman recalled a story in which a male fan came up and told her how much she enjoyed the female-led series.

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According to InStyle, Streep interjected saying that she’s glad the man found something in the show that appealed to him. She then noted that she feels the term “toxic masculinity” is detrimental to just one gender when being “toxic” is something everyone can do.

"Sometimes, I think we're hurt. We hurt our boys by calling something toxic masculinity. I do. And I don't find [that] putting those two words together … because women can be pretty f---ing toxic," Streep said. "It's toxic people. We have our good angles and we have our bad ones. I think the labels are less helpful than what we're trying to get to, which is a communication, direct, between human beings. We're all on the boat together. We've got to make it work."

Fox News' Tyler McCarthy contributed to this report.