Boston college student diagnosed with measles may have exposed others to disease

Heads up, Boston residents: A Northeastern college student who spent time in at least 10 different locations while infected with measles may have exposed others to the highly contagious disease.

The Boston Health Commission on Thursday said the student, who was not identified, was diagnosed with measles on Jan. 8, marking the first confirmed case in the city since October.

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Health officials warned that exposures at the university occurred between Jan. 3 and Jan. 6, noting he or she “frequented many locations on campus, including dormitories, dining hall and classrooms.”

The student also visited various off-campus locations on the following days:

Friday, January 3rd 

  •  Logan International Airport Terminal E 

Saturday, January 4th

  •  Blick Art Materials, 333 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 
  • Tatte Bakery & Café at the Marino Center, 369 Huntington Avenue
  • Wollaston Market in the Marino Center, 369 Huntington Avenue  

Sunday, January 5th 

  • CVS, 231 Massachusetts Avenue

Monday, January 6th  

  • Rebecca’s Café at Churchill Hall, 360 Huntington Avenue
  • AT&T Store, 699 Boylston Street
  • UNIQLO, Newbury 341 Newbury Street
  • Brandy Melville, 351 Newbury Street
  • Amelia’s Taqueria, 1076 Boylston Street

Health officials warned those exposed could become ill up to 21 days after exposure, or Jan. 24 through Jan. 27.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes. Others can contract measles when they breathe the contaminated air or touch a contaminated surface, and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth.

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“Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before through four days after the rash appears,” says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The MMR vaccine can protect both individuals and other people from contracting the virus. Young children are typically most at risk of contracting measles. The CDC recommends children get two doses of the MMR vaccination, but the first dose is typically given to children when they are between 12 and 15 months old, with the second occurring between ages 4 and 6.