Steyn on Alyssa Milano's 'sex strike': Attempts at 'woke-ness' taking us back to 'dank slumbers of 60 years ago'

Author Mark Steyn reacted Monday to actress Alyssa Milano's "sex strike" - launched in opposition to a new Georgia law that bans abortion after a baby's heartbeat is detected.

Steyn said on "Tucker Carlson Tonight" that until this point, many pro-choice advocates made claims to the effect of "abstinence education doesn't work, so we have to have abortion [rights]."

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"But abstinence apparently does work when Alyssa Milano is commanding it," he remarked.

"We just cannot risk pregnancy. Join me by not having sex," he said, paraphrasing a recent tweet by Milano.

"So, on the day that Doris Day dies, we are basically back to the sexual morality of Doris Day. "Young at Heart," circa 1954, in which Hollywood actresses now are promoting chasteness because the risk of pregnancy from having sex is too high. 'Woke-ness' eventually brings you back to the same dank slumbers of 60 years ago. It's amazing," Steyn continued.

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Day died early Monday at the age of 97.

Steyn said that the response from pro-choice activists to the new law in the Peach State was a "very weird reaction to public policy" that is "a lot more draconian than just trying to win a few elections in Georgia."

Georgia is one of several states in recent weeks that have passed legislation forbidding doctors from ending pregnancies when a heartbeat can be detected, which is roughly at six weeks.

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Critics of such legislation have argued that many women don't discover that they're pregnant in six weeks.

The entertainment industry, in particular, is wrestling over the Georgia law because many films and TV shows are made in the state due to its widely popular tax incentives.

Fox News' Caleb Parke contributed to this report.